Search Results

No Access

David Addyman

No Access

David Addyman

This paper analyses the treatment of place in Beckett's dramatic works. A number of directors have made Beckett's places much more naturalistic than the texts actually allow. Place is by something else, but the attitude misses the way in which the texts juxtapose heterogeneous places – something only possible in the theatre – the effect of which is precisely to prevent places cohering into wider, naturalistic regions, while at the same time insisting on the irreducible facticity of existence and thus resisting the reduction to placelessness found in some criticism.

No Access

Series:

Edited by Erik Tonning, Matthew Feldman and David Addyman

Modernism, Christianity and Apocalypse stages an encounter between the fields of ‘Modernism and Christianity’ and ‘Apocalypse Studies’. The modernist impulse to ‘make it new’, to transform and reform culture, is an incipiently apocalyptic one, poised between imaginative representations of an Old Era or civilization and the experimental promise of the New. Christianity figures in formative tension with the ‘new’, but its apocalyptic paradigms continued to impact modernist visions of cultural revitalization.

In three sections tracing a rough chronology from the late nineteenth century fin de siècle, via interwar conflicts and the rise of ‘political religions’, to post-1945 anxieties such as the Bomb, this thematic is explored in nineteen far-ranging scholarly contributions, outlining a distinctive and fresh interdisciplinary field of study.
No Access

Series:

Erik Tonning, Matthew Feldman and David Addyman

No Access

Series:

Erik Tonning, Matthew Feldman and David Addyman