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In: Student Voice in Mathematics Classrooms around the World
Author: David Clarke
Christoph Hein is one of the best-known authors of the former GDR, and his works of fiction have been widely interpreted as responses to and critiques of socialist society. In this study, David Clarke undertakes a detailed analysis of all of Christoph Hein’s major works of fiction from Der fremde Freund (1928) to Willenbrock (2000) in order to explore Hein’s critique of the GDR regime, whilst also demonstrating how aspects of that critique provided a starting point for Hein’s rejection of capitalism both before and after German unification. For Hein, socialism had failed to make good its promise to create a community bound together by common values and goals, preferring instead to impose conformity upon its citizens. Capitalism, he believed, was equally unable to meet the need for community, and Hein sought to demonstrate the consequences of this state of affairs in the figure of Wörle in his first post-unification novel, Das Napoleon-Spiel (1993). After this point, Clarke argues, Hein was nevertheless forced to re-examine his criticism of capitalism, a process which ultimately led to the more differentiated and convincing portrayal to be found in Willenbrock.
In: Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation
In: Teaching and Learning Mathematics through Variation
In: Algebra Teaching around the World
In: Mathematics Classrooms in Twelve Countries
Series Editor: David Clarke
The Learner’s Perspective Study provides a vehicle for the work of an international community of classroom researchers. The work of this community will be reported in a series of books of which this is the second. The documentation of the practices of classrooms in other countries causes us to question and revise our assumptions about our own practice and the theories on which that practice is based. International comparative and cross-cultural research has the capacity to inform practice, shape policy and develop theory at a level commensurate with regional, national or global priorities. International comparative research offers us more than insights into the novel, interesting and adaptable practices employed in other school systems. It also offers us insights into the strange, invisible, and unquestioned routines and rituals of our own school system and our own classrooms. In addition, a cross-cultural perspective on classrooms can help us identify common values and shared assumptions, encouraging the adaptation of practices from one classroom for use in a different cultural setting. As these findings become more widely available, they will be increasingly utilised in the professional development of teachers and in the development of new theory.
In: Mathematical Tasks in Classrooms Around the World