Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for

  • Author or Editor: David Feldman x

Lyndsay Moseley and David Lewis Feldman

Abstract

Christian faith-based environmental reform efforts in Appalachia advance a framework for policy change based on the view that the roots of the contemporary environmental crisis are moral and spiritual in nature. We examine how this framework is advanced among twenty faith-based organizations in Appalachia—a region with a legacy of serious environmental problems and a strong Christian tradition. We argue that these groups call for a new paradigm for assessing the causes of environmental problems—and for alleviating them. Unlike the traditional paradigm for change, which emphasizes political alterations, faith-based initiatives in Appalachia seek to advance environmental reform by promoting a transformation of personal values, attitudes, and conduct in support of an environmental ethic of care. Furthermore, these initiatives' strategies focus on educational and other strategies that can bring about this personal transformation—and, eventually, societal change. The major assumptions promoted by the traditional paradigm are seen by these Appalachian initiatives as key reasons for continued environmental degradation, while the underlying values of the new paradigm constitute a vision for an earth-keeping community having individual and global dimensions.

Series:

Edited by Erik Tonning, Matthew Feldman and David Addyman

Modernism, Christianity and Apocalypse stages an encounter between the fields of ‘Modernism and Christianity’ and ‘Apocalypse Studies’. The modernist impulse to ‘make it new’, to transform and reform culture, is an incipiently apocalyptic one, poised between imaginative representations of an Old Era or civilization and the experimental promise of the New. Christianity figures in formative tension with the ‘new’, but its apocalyptic paradigms continued to impact modernist visions of cultural revitalization.

In three sections tracing a rough chronology from the late nineteenth century fin de siècle, via interwar conflicts and the rise of ‘political religions’, to post-1945 anxieties such as the Bomb, this thematic is explored in nineteen far-ranging scholarly contributions, outlining a distinctive and fresh interdisciplinary field of study.

Series:

Erik Tonning, Matthew Feldman and David Addyman

Series:

Erik Tonning, Matthew Feldman and David Addyman