Author: David Satran
The Lives of the Prophets, a series of brief biographical sketches of the major and minor prophets of the Hebrew Bible, is a unique composition. Generally held to be a Jewish document from the end of the period of the Second Temple, the Lives offers an abundance of geographical, genealogical, and narrative detail which is not readily paralleled. This study provides the first thorough assessment of the work in nearly a century. A survey of the textual state of the composition and its reception is followed by a detailed examination of the literary structures which underlie the individual vitae. It is argued that the Lives is an evolved, heavily redacted document whose present form cannot predate the fourth century C.E. Only within the context of early Byzantine Christian concerns — holy men, sacred sites, and the veneration of the saints — does the Lives of the Prophets become a comprehensible and vital text.
In: The Embroidered Bible: Studies in Biblical Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha in Honour of Michael E. Stone
Studies in Early Jewish and Christian Literature in Honor of Michael E. Stone
This rich collection of articles dedicated to Michael E. Stone by his colleagues and students honors his contributions to the study of Judaism and Christianity. Many of the articles discuss apocryphal and pseudepigraphical works stemming from Jewish or Christian authors and transmitted primarily but not exclusively by Christian scribes. Particularly well-represented are the earliest books of 1 Enoch and the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs. A number of articles introduce newly available material from the Dead Sea Scrolls while others deal with Philo, Hellenistic Judaism, and early Christianity. Issues of biblical interpretation, tradition-history, literary transmission, and social context figure prominently. This book is a companion to the study of apocrypha, pseudepigrapha, Dead Sea Scrolls, early Judaism, and early Christianity.
Proceedings of the Eleventh International Symposium of the Orion Center for the Study of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature, Jointly Sponsored by the Hebrew University Center for the Study of Christianity, 9–11 January, 2007
2007 marked the 60th anniversary of the discovery of the first Dead Sea Scrolls. The 11th International Orion Symposium (January, 2007), “New Approaches to the Study of Biblical Interpretation in the Second Temple Period and in Early Christianity,” provided a measure of the ways in which the discovery of the scrolls has altered the paradigms for textual and historical studies in the intervening six decades. The papers in this volume address such issues as the connections and distinctions between Jewish interpretation within the Land of Israel and outside of it; between Jewish and Christian exegesis in earlier and later periods; between biblical interpretation in literature and in art; between interpretation and the formation of the biblical canon.
In: New Approaches to the Study of Biblical Interpretation in Judaism of the Second Temple Period and in Early Christianity
In: New Approaches to the Study of Biblical Interpretation in Judaism of the Second Temple Period and in Early Christianity
In: New Approaches to the Study of Biblical Interpretation in Judaism of the Second Temple Period and in Early Christianity