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Author: David Sciulli
Professions are central to any political sociology of major associations, organizations and venues in civil society underpinning democracy; they are not a subset of livelihoods in a mundane sociology of work and occupations. Professions in Civil Society and the State is at once elegant and startling in its directness and the sheer scope of its implications for future comparative research and theory. Not since Talcott Parsons during the early 1970s has any sociologist (or political scientist) pursued this line of inquiry. Sciulli’s theoretical approach differs fundamentally from Parsons’ and rests on a breadth of historical and cross-national support that always eluded him. The sociology of professions has come full circle, leaving behind Parsons, his critics, and two generations of received wisdom.
Author: David Sciulli
Among all sociologists in the world born after 1900, Amitai Etzioni ranks ninth in total citations. One reason for this is his thousands of publications span theory, organizations, international politics, democratic politics, socio-economics and communitarianism, and they have been adopted in undergraduate coursework within each of these areas. Written for social theorists as well as general readers (including undergraduates) David Sciulli's book is the first to explain not only how but also why Amitai Etzioni’s publications evolved from his dissertation to Active Society and Socio-Economics to Communitarianism.
Author: David Sciulli

Abstract

Aside from English law being cited as pioneering the first professionalism project, French law is also frequently treated as an exemplar of early professionalism. We challenge this consensus by demonstrating that the Academie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture of Paris preceded along a professionalism project centuries in advance of French law. Using this comparison, we also provide alternative explanations for questions and issues which remain troubling in the literature of French law.

In: Comparative Sociology
In: Comparative Sociology
Author: David Sciulli

Abstract

One consensus in the sociology and history of professions is that law, not medicine, pioneered the first professionalism projects in Western history. English law is typically cited as the exemplar. We challenge this consensus by demonstrating that visual academies, led by the Academie Royale de Peinture et de Sculpture of Paris, preceded along a professionalism project centuries in advance of English law.

In: Comparative Sociology
In: Comparative Sociology
Author: David Sciulli

Abstract

The vast majority of contributors to the sociology of professions literature fail to distinguish professions from other occupations, and it sees this as a virtue, not a noteworthy gap at a conceptual level. Talcott Parsons’ most methodical treatment of professions which earlier opposed this position has gone unread, and today has largely disappeared from the literature. Two cases, one historical (the Paris Académie de Peinture et de Sculpture), the other contemporary (the governance of publicly traded corporation as overseen by Delaware courts), challenge the majoritarian position as its core, at a conceptual level. They compel a more abstract, analytical, approach to profession and professionalism. We conclude by presenting the issues and questions presented to all contributors in preparation for this special topic.

In: Comparative Sociology
Author: David Sciulli

Abstract

Received wisdom in the sociology of professions employs two approaches, a narrow socio-economic approach (largely in the Anglo-American world) and a much broader cultural and social-psychological approach (largely on the Continent). Both approaches agree on two points. First, professions cannot be distinguished at a conceptual level from other occupations. Second, whatever consequences either successful or failed professionalism introduces into civil society or state administration are confined to the occupational order and stratification system. They do not and cannot affect the direction of social change. The alternative approach outlined and discussed here is structural and institutional. With this approach we distinguish professions proper analytically from other occupations and we identify consequences of professionalism proper that uniquely reflect or anticipate notable shifts in the direction of social change.

In: Comparative Sociology
In: Etzioni’s Critical Functionalism
In: Etzioni’s Critical Functionalism