Author: David Sklare

‭Muʿtazilite ideas and tendencies probably began to percolate into Jewish culture by the early ninth century. The reception of Muʿtazilite Kalām among Jews can be observed not only among those who wrote theological works, but also among those who were not professional theologians, both Rabbanites and Karaites. The presence of Kalām doctrines seems to have been rather widespread and longlasting, found among some Karaites until at least the seventeenth century.‬

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World
In: Senses of Scripture, Treasures of Tradition
In: Karaite Judaism
Author: David E. Sklare
Samuel ben ḥofni Gaon was head of the Yeshiva of Sura in Baghdad during the cultural renaissance which characterized the Buyid period. His writings reflect the impact of Arabic literature on Jewish intellectuals at this time.
The first part of this volume presents the known details of his life and extensive writings and describes the dynamics of contemporary, tenth-century Jewish culture: the decline and temporary restoration of the yeshivot and the intellectual activity outside of them. Additionally, some of the basic concepts of his thought, strongly influenced by Mu‘tazilite Kalām, are explained.
The book provides the Judeo-Arabic text and annotated English translation of two of his works on legal theory, his Treatise on the Commandments and Ten Questions, reconstructed from manuscript fragments from the Cairo Geniza.
An Edition and Translation of Judah Hadassi’s Eshkol ha-kofer, First Commandment, and Studies of the Book’s Judaeo-Arabic and Byzantine Contexts. Karaite Texts and Studies, Volume 11
Judah Hadassi was the most prominent Karaite Jewish author of twelfth-century Byzantium, steeped in Karaite and Byzantine Greek traditions. In Theological Encounters at a Crossroads: An Edition and Translation of Judah Hadassi’s Eshkol ha-kofer, First Commandment, and Studies of the Book’s Judaeo-Arabic and Byzantine Contexts, a scientific edition of the first quarter of the Hebrew text of Hadassi’s magnum opus is presented with an English translation, a summary of his theology, a discussion of his use of the Greek language, and a linguistic analysis and transcription of all the Greek terms which appear in Hebrew letters in the entire treatise. This book should be of interest to students of Jewish thought, Hebrew literature and medieval Byzantine culture and language.
In: Theological Encounters at a Crossroads
In: Theological Encounters at a Crossroads
In: Theological Encounters at a Crossroads
In: Theological Encounters at a Crossroads
In: Theological Encounters at a Crossroads