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Author: David Thang Moe

The aim of this article is to explore the hermeneutics of identity and otherness and then to propose some methodological ways of how a Christian should rethink his or her identity and the identity of the other. This article takes the Trinitarian nature of personal diversity and one divine communion identity as paradigms for addressing the identity of the Christian communion and the human communion with cultural otherness. Finally, the article examines a mutual transformation of thicker identity as the telos of a critical engagement and mutual embrace between Christians and the other in a pluralistic world.

In: Ecclesiology
Author: David Thang Moe

Asian Public Theology: Critical Concerns in Challenging Times. Delhi: ispck, 2010. Pp. iv–336. $ 41.00

This book is written by Asian-Indian Catholic theologian Felix Wilfred. What we know and learn about public theology in Asia is normally a Western mode of public theology. In this volume, one of the noted Asian theologians Wilfred explores various issues and critical concerns of Asian public theology in a timely manner. Based on his broad and deep knowledge of Asian theology and context, Wilfred is among few Asian theologians who could write this constructively and contextually. His research publications include a

In: International Journal of Public Theology
Author: David Thang Moe

Between A Rock and a Hard Place: Public Theology in a Post-Secular Age. London: scm Press, 2013. Pp. vii-266. $ 84.56

This book is written by one of the noted British feminist public theologians Elaine Graham who is currently teaching at the University of Chichester in uk. The book is a product of her international experiences such as, in Scotland, Germany, South Africa, and Australia. The purpose of this book is to focus on the future of public theology in which she terms a ‘post-secular age.’ Expressed in her own word: “my interest in the

In: Journal of Empirical Theology
Author: David Thang Moe

The purpose of this paper is to study Kosuke Koyama (1929-2009), one of the foremost Asian Christian theologians of the 20th century. His theology and missiology are narratively rooted in the Biblical soils and contextually flowered in the Asian fields. Therefore, this article is written in great appreciation for the missionary labours and theological thoughts he had done with joy. The paper is divided into three parts. In the first part, I examine Koyama’s biographical backgrounds. In the second part, I explore his key hermeneutics of a theology of the cross and how he employed it for a missiological interpretation of hospitality in a hostile context. Finally, I evaluate Koyama’s theological position through the contemporary lens of a religiously pluralistic world.

In: Exchange
Author: David Thang Moe

Theravada Buddhism is a national religion of the Burman majorities, whereas Christianity is an alienated religion of the ethnic minorities in Myanmar. Failing to embrace one another, ethnic Christians and Burman Buddhists built boundaries of mutual exclusion and hostility. This paper will argue that wrongs are on both sides — for instance, Buddhism becomes an ‘analogy’ of Judaism in terms of its nationalistic imperialism, whereas Christianity as an analogy of Hellenism in terms of its religious supersessionism. I will employ the idea of embrace as a theological response to the problem of exclusion. In particular, I will explore the boundary breaking of Jesus and the bridge building of Paul in a Greco-Roman context as the contextual models for Myanmar.

In: Exchange
Author: David Thang Moe

This paper will read Jn 20.21–22 as a missional text of Johannine Trinitarian Missiology. It will argue that mission is proper first to the being and the act of the Trinity, and secondarily a concept in the church—the witness of the Trinity. The aim of this paper is threefold. First, it will explore the nature of the Trinity as a missionary God who sent the Son/incarnate Word and the Spirit/the cosmic Breath into the world. Secondly, it will examine how Christ as the Word and witness of the Father moves from the sent to the caller and sender of apostles into the world through the power of the Spirit. Third, seeing the world as the scope of the mission of Christ and apostles, this paper will study Christ’s boundary-crossing mission of incarnation and reconciliation as a model of the Church’s boundary-crossing mission witness in a pluralistic and Spirit-present world.

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology
Author: David Thang Moe

This article examines the contrasts found in the Lukan banquet parable (Lk. 14.12–24). While most scholars tend to focus on the role of the banquet host or on the role of the guests, many interpreters forget the role of the servant in the parable. This article re-considers the equally important roles of the inviting host, the invited guests, and the sent servant for a paradigmatic relation between a trinitarian theological paradigm of hospitality and a trinitarian church’s hospitable identity and vocation in a contemporary world of hostility. It is argued that a trinitarian church must embody the Trinity in its twofold inseparable move of reaching out to the other by crossing their cultures as a metaphorical reflection of external Trinity and of receiving them in by making a hospitable space for the other as a reflection of internal Trinity.

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology
Author: David Thang Moe

Abstract

The Protestant Christian existence in Myanmar can be characterized by three significant phases: the first phase led by foreign missionaries; the second led by foreign missionary-trained local pastors; and the current third phase in which the local Christian churches need to be theologically and missiologically rooted. Despite its two hundred years of existence in the nation (since Adoniram Judson’s mission in 1813), Christianity remains alienated in society, primarily because of Christians’ exclusion from the national religion, Buddhism. Taking the third phase as a major concern for a theology of mission in the twenty-first century in Myanmar’s pluralistic context, where the churches exist in the midst of the Buddhist pagodas, I will propose a theology of embrace as a missiological response to the problem of exclusion.

In: Mission Studies
Author: David Thang Moe

Scott R. Paeth, E. Harold Breitenberg Jr., and Hak Joon Lee (eds.), Shaping Public Theology: Selections from the Writings of Max L. Stackhouse (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2014), x + 358 pp., $ 40.00, ISBN 9780802868817.

Shaping Public Theology is the second collection of essays of Max L. Stackhouse published in the course of his career. Although Stackhouse died early this year on January 30, 2016, his legacy remains alive in the field of public theology. Of the three editors of this volume, Scott Paeth and Hak Lee studied with Stackhouse at Princeton Seminary, while Harold Breitenberg focused his dissertation on Stackhouse’s

In: Journal of Reformed Theology
Author: David Thang Moe

A Companion to Public Theology (Leiden: Brill, 2017), pp. vi–495. isbn 13-978-9004336056, $ 171.

When it comes to public theology, it is worth giving credit to the American theologian Martin Marty for coining the term ‘public theology’ and for providing a description of it in the 1960s. Since then, public theology has now come to the forefront in global theological discourses. We now have a Global Network in Public Theology (gnpt), which was provisionally set up at a conference held in Edinburgh, Scotland in 2005 and formally constituted a second conference held at Princeton Theological

In: International Journal of Public Theology