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600-1500
Christian-Muslim Relations: A Bibliographical History Online (CMR Online) is a general online history of relations between the faiths. It covers the period from 600 to 1500 CE, when encounters took place through the extended Mediterranean basin and are recorded in Syriac, Arabic, Greek, Latin and other languages. It comprises introductory essays on the treatment of Christians in the Qur’an, Qur’an commentaries, biographies of the Prophet, Hadith and Sunni law, and of Muslims in canon law, and the main body of more than two hundred detailed entries on all the works recorded, whether surviving or lost. The result of collaboration between leading scholars, CMR Online is intended as an invaluable tool for research in Christian-Muslim relations.

Christian Muslim Relations: A Bibliographical History is also available in print, visit www.brill.com/hcmr.

Features and Benefits
- International expert authorship
- Unrivalled comprehensive bibliographic reference work on Christian Muslim Relations
- Covers the period 600-1500
- Cross-searchable database
- Easy access to up-to-date information
1500-1900
Christian-Muslim Relations Online 2 (CMRO2) is a bibliographical history of relations between the two faiths as they are reflected in works written by Christians and Muslims about the other and against the other. It covers all parts of the world from the year 1500 to 1914, including the ages of European expansion and colonialism. CMRO2 comprises thousands of comprehensive entries on individual works and their authors, together with introductory essays to the periods and areas covered, making it the fullest available source in this field.

Features and Benefits
- International expert authorship
- Unrivalled comprehensive bibliographic reference work on Christian-Muslim Relations
- Covers the period 1500-1900
- Cross-searchable database
- Easy access to up-to-date information
Author: David Thomas
By the tenth century Islamic theology had become an integrated system by which theologians constructed sophisticated accounts of the nature of the world and God's relationship with it. They also used it to establish proofs that Islam was the only rationally tenable form of belief, building these in part on proofs of the illogicalities in other faiths, including Christianity. Through excerpts from key works of the theologians al-Nashi' al-Akbar, al-Maturidi, al-Baqillani and ʿAbd al-Jabbar, this book shows how Muslim theologians in this period made use of Christian doctrines as examples of misguided thinking to help confirm the correctness of their own theology, and how among Muslim theologians Christianity had ceased to attract serious attention as a rival to Islam.
Author: David Thomas
The contributions to this volume, which come from the Fifth Mingana Symposium, survey the use of the Bible and attitudes towards it in the early and classical Islamic periods. The authors explore such themes as early Christian translations of the Bible into Arabic, the use of verses from it to defend the truth of Christianity, to interpret the significance of Islam and to prove its error, Muslim accusations of corruption of the Bible, and the influences that affected production of Bibles in Muslims lands. The volume illustrates the centrality of the Bible to Arab Christians as a source of authority and information about their experiences under Islam, and the importance of upholding its authenticity in the face of Muslim criticisms.

Contributors include: Samir Arbache, Mark Beaumont, Emmanouela Grypeou, Lucy-Anne Hunt, Juan Pedro Monferrer Sala, Said Gabriel Reynolds, Barbara Roggema, Harald Suermann and Mark Swanson.
Author: David Thomas
This volume contains papers from the Third Woodbrooke-Mingana Symposium on Arab Christianity and Islam (September 1998) on the theme of "Arab Christianity in Bilâd al-Shâm (Greater Syria) in the pre-Ottoman Period". It presents aspects of Syrian Christian life and thought during the first millennium of Islamic rule.
Among the eight contributing scholars are Sidney Griffith on ninth-century Christological controversies, Samir K. Samir on the Prophet Muhammed seen through Arab Christian eyes, Lawrence Conrad on the physician Ibn Butlân, and Lucy-Anne Hunt on Muslim influence on Christian book illustrations. There is also a foreword by the Syrian Orthodox Archbishop of Aleppo.
The picture that emerges is of community life developing in its own way and finding a distinctive character, as Christians responded to the social and intellectual influences of Islam.
Author: David Thomas
The chapters in this volume, which come from the Fourth Woodbrooke-Mingana Symposium, cover aspects of Christian life in and around Baghdad in the early centuries of 'Abbasid rule.
The authors explore both broad themes, such as the place of monasteries in Muslim cultural life, accusations of Islam as crypto-idolatry, and Muslim responses to Christian apologetic arguments, and also specific topics, such as a Nestorian's explanation of the Incarnation, a Jacobite's purpose in composing his guide to moral improvement, and the development of Christian legends about the caliph al-Ma'mun.
The volume illustrates the vigour of Iraqi Christian life in 'Abbasid times, and helps show that relations between Christians and Muslims, although strained at times, were often beneficial to followers of both faiths.