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In: Pentateuchal Traditions in the Late Second Temple Period
In: Vetus Testamentum
In: Vetus Testamentum

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to establish the "phonic" nature of some of the socalled "corrupt" passages in the MT of Samuel. We are particularly interested in Samuel's "aural" characteristics which might be represented in the phonetic spellings. This aural aspect of the narrative is clearly attested in cases where the Ketib and the Qere give two variant forms of the same word or phrase. In such cases, the K. usually represent "phonic" reality by a phonetic spelling. By contrast, the Q. points to the "correct" historical spelling. Such aural features can be demonstrated in other ways in the MT of Samuel, especially when 2 Sam. xxii is compared with its duplicate text, Ps. xviii. These variant forms are caused by phonological phenomena such as assimilation, metathesis, palatalization, vowel sandhi, consonantal sandhi, and glide. These examples are not exhaustive, but they are sufficient to show that many of the often-asserted "scribal errors" are actually rather phonetic spellings and do reflect the "economy" of pronunciation. Such phonic realization in writing is attested not simply in poetic texts but also in prose sections of 1-2 Samuel. Hence, our topic is not so much a problem of literary-linguistic composition as a matter of the method of writing, i.e. graphic and graphemic representation of an aural text.

In: Vetus Testamentum
In: Vetus Testamentum

Abstract

In Nathan’s second prophetic speech (2 Sam. 7:8-16), at first the flow of narrative discourse is carried on by the sequence of the verbal forms qtl—wayqtl—wayqtl (vs. 8b-9a) but, in v. 9b, the flow is changed, if not stopped, by the sequence w-qtl... w-qtl... See 1 Sam 17:38, 2 Sam 12:16. Vs. 9b-11a is what Longacre calls a “how-it was-done” procedural discourse and serves structurally as a transition from the Lord’s past dealings with David in vs. 8b-9a to his future dealings with David in vs. 12-16. Thus, vs. 8b-9a conveys a past fact, and how it was done is explained concretely by the “procedural” discourse in vs. 9b-11a. Such a narrative-procedural discourse with the sequence of verbal forms wayqtl. . . w-qtl can also be seen in 1 Sam 1:4, 7:15-16, 2 Sam 13:18, Job 1:5.

In: Vetus Testamentum
In: Vetus Testamentum

Abstract

Hab. iii 4 is a "Janus parallelism", where qarnayim in 4b corresponds to nōgah ("brightness") in 4a with the meaning "rays" and to 'uzzōh ("his power") in 4c with the meaning "horns".

In: Vetus Testamentum

Abstract

In Hebrew poetry, a vertical grammatical relation between two parallel lines can be noted in bicolons such as Ps 18:42. One can also recognize the vertical grammar between the first and the last lines of a tetracolon, in such passages as Amos 1:5, Job 12:24-25, 2 Sam 3:33b-34c, Ps 89:36-37, and 2 Sam 7:22. In this pattern, the AXX’B pattern, the middle two lines are a bicolon (XX’) inserted into another bicolon (AB). In this article I focus on the vertical grammatical relationship between line A and line B, which constitute either a simple sentence or a complex sentence in the Hebrew text.

In: Vetus Testamentum