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In: Nelson Mandela
In: Nelson Mandela
Volume Editor: Diane Brook Napier
In a growing revisionist tradition, comparative educational scholars challenge conventional assumptions about quality education as a singular undertaking dominated by standardised assessments and globalisation influences. The contributors to this volume illustrate the complexities and global dimensions of educational quality that emerged in their research. Several chapters critique educational reforms employing assessments aligned to global standards and large scale assessments, revealing how considerations of contextual factors, internal needs and local traditions are essential for developing a quality curriculum or for overhauling a national education system. Most chapters interrogate the uses and misuses of standardised assessment results. The contributors reveal the importance of asking critical questions about quality education: how to access it and for what purposes; what contextual and cultural factors are important; what implementation issues and local-level realities must be considered for true understanding of standardized assessment results; what content, skills and values are necessary and desirable ingredients; what roles teachers and administrators play; and what benefits accrue in terms of outcomes for employment and labor market needs or for achieving autonomy and stakeholder participation. Critiques of narrow interpretations of standardised assessment data contrast with research-based evidence that participation in large scale assessments such as PISA, TIMSS and PIRLS can indeed be beneficial to identify needed reform refinements and implementation shortcomings. Specific country cases include Brazil, Canada, the United States, Spain, Portugal, Ukraine, Kyrgyzstan, and the Philippines. Other chapters provide insights on quality education issues worldwide. The volume offers readers a panorama of views on the diversity of paths to quality education.
In: Qualities of Education in a Globalised World
In: Interculturalism, Society and Education
In: Qualities of Education in a Globalised World
In: Qualities of Education in a Globalised World
This volume is a collection of research cases illustrating the interrelationships among education, dominance and identity in historical- and contemporary contexts. The cases reflect particular ways in which local-, group, and indigenous identities have been affected by a dominant discourse, how education can support or undermine identity, and how languages (including dominant and sub-dominant languages) and the language of instruction in schools are at the centre of challenges to hegemony and domination in many situations. Examining the issues in their research, the contributors reveal how members of minority-, disadvantaged-, or dominated groups (and the teachers and parents of children in their schools) struggle for recognition, for education in their own language, for acceptance within larger society, or for recognition of the validity of their responses to reform initiatives and policies that address a wider agenda but that fail to take into account key factors such as perceptions and subaltern status.
Collectively, the chapters document research employing a variety of methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives, illustrating an array of universal and global issues in the field of comparative and international education. However, each of the cases its own unique character, as research findings and as personal reflections based on the authors’ experiential knowledge in particular social, cultural and political contexts. The contexts and regional settings include Chile, Canada, the United States, Hungary and elsewhere in East-Central Europe, France, Germany, Spain, Malaysia, Tanzania, South Africa, Cyprus, Tunisia, Egypt, Iran and elsewhere in the Middle East.
In no part of the world today is the concept of intercultural exchange a novelty, and in many parts of the world it has even been a long tradition. Nevertheless, recent globalization forces have combined to accelerate many aspects of migration and intercultural confrontation. As a result, we see an emerging world society in which intercultural mixing and conflict are salient characteristics, rather than being exceptional situations or embryonic phases of societal development. The need for intercultural education and for intercultural dialogue in various forms has become universal. All people have an obligation to participate in- and take responsibility for- world peace, balanced sustainable development, and democratic dialogue to create “the capacity to live together.” Persistent and increasingly complex patterns of population movement, with all of the societal ramifications that accompany them, demand consideration of ways in which different societies respond to issues of intercultural education and dialogue, both historically and currently.
Interculturalism, Society and Education contains contributions that explore comparative and international case studies ranging from accounts of educational problems impacting specific immigrant groups in Europe, socio-educational programs and projects in Africa and Asia, comparative analyses of “citizenship education” issues in selected countries, and a global overview of different patterns of the interculturalism-society-education nexus. This volume offers a sampling of the multiplicity of intercultural forms around the world, useful for policy-makers and educators across the spectrum of institutions and organizations that strive to open paths for positive intercultural exchange through education.
In: Interculturalism, Society and Education