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In: Community-Based Healthcare
In: Community-Based Healthcare
In: Community-Based Healthcare
In: Community-Based Healthcare
Authors: Simon Munro and Diane Tasker

Abstract

Knowledge and cultural understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures can be accessed through artefact-based learning and the use of Yarning, conducted in dialogue with Aboriginal people as custodians of that knowledge. Participation in the symbolic and material nature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge transmission through artefact-based learning can challenge existing perspectives and lead to real cross-cultural systemic change.

Yarning together to write this chapter: The evolution of this chapter would not have been possible without the, sometimes, momentary, and other lengthy conversations (Yarns) between co-authors Simon Munro and Diane Tasker. For Simon, having a Yarn in his Aboriginal culture of the Kamilaroi and Anaiwan is about seeking and being curious about the anabranches of another person’s life. (This term is used symbolically to convey curiosity about the many stories that make up a person’s life. It means a stream that leaves a river and re-enters it further along its course.) The off-topic information creates a familiar environment where almost, anything is okay to talk about. There is no doubt that the coming together of this chapter is a result of the many invisible Yarns that occurred between the authors. This chapter encodes a great deal of personal experiences and lived journeys that many readers will connect with. Yarning and Wisdom is evidence that change in how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices are emerging hand in hand with non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander brothers and sisters. Everyone can connect with a Yarn irrespective of their heritage.

In: Shaping Wise Futures

Abstract

The twenty-first century has ushered in existential challenges for life on earth. This chapter explores some of the social movements preceding and responding to these challenges. As the urgency for change increases, we reflect upon the reasons for the successes and failures of relevant long-term campaigns within the Australian context: First Nations rights and environmental conservation. We ask what wisdom can be gleaned from reflections on past and continuing social movements to assist humanity’s rise to the challenges of the twenty-first century?

In: Shaping Wise Futures
In: Professional Practice Discourse Marginalia
In: Community-Based Healthcare
In: Community-Based Healthcare
In: Community-Based Healthcare