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Author: Dietrich Jung

Abstract

This chapter presents the overarching framework and tentative findings of the Modern Muslim Subjectivities Project (mmsp). The project aims to explore the role of Islamic traditions in the construction of modern forms of Muslim subjectivities and social orders. It poses questions as to how Muslims have imagined specifically Islamic modernities in combination with non-religious and globally relevant cultural scripts. The chapter introduces the theoretical and conceptual frame of reference of the mmsp and proceeds in three steps, moving from the theoretical macro to the micro levels with illustrative empirical examples from the chapters of this volume.

In: Muslim Subjectivities in Global Modernity
Author: Dietrich Jung

Abstract

This chapter presents the overarching framework and tentative findings of the Modern Muslim Subjectivities Project (mmsp). The project aims to explore the role of Islamic traditions in the construction of modern forms of Muslim subjectivities and social orders. It poses questions as to how Muslims have imagined specifically Islamic modernities in combination with non-religious and globally relevant cultural scripts. The chapter introduces the theoretical and conceptual frame of reference of the mmsp and proceeds in three steps, moving from the theoretical macro to the micro levels with illustrative empirical examples from the chapters of this volume.

In: Muslim Subjectivities in Global Modernity
Author: Dietrich Jung

Abstract

This article presents the overarching theoretical framework and some tentative findings of the Modern Muslim Subjectivities Project (MMSP). It discusses some of its conceptual tools and presents strategies for studying the role of religion in modern Muslim subjectivity formation. The core rationale of this research program is to explore the role of religious traditions in the construction of modern forms of Muslim subjectivity and social order. It investigates the ways in which Muslims have imagined specifically Islamic modernities in combination with non-religious and globally relevant cultural scripts. In criticizing the alleged Western origin and secular nature of modernity, the MMSP aims at making original contributions both to conceptual discussions of modernity in the study of religions and to our knowledge of modern Muslim societies.

In: Numen
In: Muslim Subjectivities in Global Modernity
Islamic Traditions and the Construction of Modern Muslim Identities
Volume Editors: Dietrich Jung and Kirstine Sinclair
With critical reference to Eisenstadt’s theory of “multiple modernities,” Muslim Subjectivities in Global Modernity discusses the role of religion in the modern world. The case studies all provide examples illustrating the ambition to understand how Islamic traditions have contributed to the construction of practices and expressions of modern Muslim selfhoods. In doing so, they underpin Eisenstadt’s argument that religious traditions can play a pivotal role in the construction of historically different interpretations of modernity. At the same time, however, they point to a void in Eisenstadt’s approach that does not problematize the multiplicity of forms in which this role of religious traditions plays out historically. Consequently, the authors of the present volume focus on the multiple modernities within Islam, which Eisenstadt’s theory hardly takes into account.
Author: Dietrich Jung

This article looks at the intersection between Protestant theology and sociology in the construction of the modern concept of religion. Set against the theoretical background of the functional differentiation of modern society, it identifies the origin of this concept in the discursive ‘scientification’ of religion by the emerging disciplines of the humanities and social sciences. In taking the life and work of William Robertson Smith (1846–94) as an example, the article analyzes the transformation of some specific elements of liberal Protestant theology into a set of universal features that came to represent religion as a modern concept. In this way, it argues against confusing the modern concept of religion with a ‘Christian model’ as such, and also against rejecting the concept as a mere ideological tool of secularist ideologies.

In: Journal of Religion in Europe
In: Numen