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In: Good Neighbourliness in the European Legal Context
In: The European Union in the World
In: European Citizenship under Stress
In: Issues in International Migration Law
In: The Reconceptualization of European Union Citizenship
Good Neighbourliness in the European Legal Context provides the first detailed assessment of the essence and application of the principle of good neighbourly relations in the European legal context, illustrating its findings by a multi-faceted array of studies dedicated to the functioning of good neighbourly relations in a number of key fields of EU law. The main claim put forward in this book is that the principle of good neighbourly relations came to occupy a vital place in the Europan legal context, underpinning the very essence of the integration exercise.
In: Good Neighbourliness in the European Legal Context
In: Good Neighbourliness in the European Legal Context
In: Good Neighbourliness in the European Legal Context

Contemporary thinking about nationality is surrounded by three persistent mythologies. First, all nationalities are equal. Second, there is a direct correlation between the power and size of the economy of a country and the quality of its nationality. Third, there is a correlation between the geographical scope of the rights granted by a nationality and the territory of the conferring state. Looking beyond the subjective feelings one may have towards one’s nationality, the widely diverging quality of nationalities can in fact be measured. In the Quality of Nationality Index, which this article introduces and discusses, an attempt has been made to develop and deploy a reliable and straightforward methodology to measure objectively the value of having a particular nationality, which would not be perception-based. Nationalities are not equal, at least not under the assumption that the level of expected welfare, education, healthcare, life chances, and global travel and settlement opportunities matter.

In: European Journal of Comparative Law and Governance