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In: New Quotatoes: Joycean Exogenesis in the Digital Age
In: Textual Scholarship and the Material Book
Author: Dirk Van Hulle

Abstract

While most European editors in the so-called Sattelzeit (the period leading up to and following after the French Revolution) were preoccupied with establishing and fixating national Urtexts in the service of nation-building, authors became increasingly aware of the literary creation as a process and started preserving their rough drafts and manuscripts. This trend prefigured a Darwinian change in editorial thinking: from an essentialist approach to a new focus on gestations and processes, marked by an acceptance of imperfection and an appreciation of the value of ‘mistakes’ as a crucial element in the dynamics of writing.

In: Editing the Nation’s Memory
Author: Dirk Van Hulle

Abstract

This article suggests a reversal of roles: instead of using manuscript research to make an edition, it conceives of an edition as a tool for doing manuscript research. The case study is Joyce’s red-backed, “Guiltless” copybook, more specifically the genesis of the phrase “genesic field” in Chapter I.5 of Finnegans Wake. After a short survey of the history of editorial approaches, the article proposes a way of modelling a digital genetic edition of “Work in Progress” according to five categories (exo-, endo-, epi-, macro- and microgenesis), thus taking up Daniel Ferrer’s suggestion to devise “models for a genetic criticism” in the digital age.

In: James Joyce and Genetic Criticism
In: New Quotatoes: Joycean Exogenesis in the Digital Age
Author: Dirk Van Hulle

Abstract

This article suggests a reversal of roles: instead of using manuscript research to make an edition, it conceives of an edition as a tool for doing manuscript research. The case study is Joyce’s red-backed, “Guiltless” copybook, more specifically the genesis of the phrase “genesic field” in Chapter I.5 of Finnegans Wake. After a short survey of the history of editorial approaches, the article proposes a way of modelling a digital genetic edition of “Work in Progress” according to five categories (exo-, endo-, epi-, macro- and microgenesis), thus taking up Daniel Ferrer’s suggestion to devise “models for a genetic criticism” in the digital age.

In: James Joyce and Genetic Criticism
Author: Dirk Van Hulle

This essay investigates to what extent it is possible with hindsight, on the basis of manuscripts, to reconstruct the cognitive process underlying the textual genesis of a literary work. The case study is Beckett’s novel Molloy and the characterization of Molloy and Moran against the background of Beckett’s reading of André Gide’s Dostoïevsky and Pierre Gustave Brunet’s Curiosités théologiques. The seemingly programmatic Molloy/Moran dichotomy, possibly modelled after Gide’s contrast between Dostoevsky and Balzac, turns out to be the result of an écriture à processus rather than à programme. This case study serves to illustrate how consciousness enactment, combined with an enactivist approach to cognition, can be of help in defining the role of the reader in genetic criticism.

In: Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd'hui