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Abstract

Insect collecting as a pastime has a long history, but the later decades of the eighteenth century proved an important era for the development of entomology as an academic subject. Two processes influenced this development: firstly, the advancement of Linnaean systematics in botany and zoology caused paradigmatic changes in the perception, systematization and classification of insects; secondly, ever-growing numbers of specimens were accumulated in European cabinets of natural history. The professionalization and popularization of entomology combined to produce a plethora of literature giving advice on how to collect and preserve insects. Here we look at the material aspects of collecting and the ways in which European naturalists conceptualized the practices of collecting.


In: Naturalists in the Field
The Brill series Emergence of Natural History (ENH) features books that examine the historic attitude of humans towards nature as an object of study, and the development of the field of knowledge we now know as natural history. Observing, collecting and explaining the diversity of nature has been important throughout history. This series addresses the many faces of natural history from the classical age up to the early nineteenth century. It is particularly designed to include volumes on the lives, work and networks of people whose contributions have proven foundational, but who have been overshadowed by more well-known figures such as Linnaeus and Darwin. Volumes encompass the global and cultural history of natural history, explore the role played by practitioners such as traveling naturalists, collectors, artists, and bring attention to indigenous, visual, and manuscript sources.

Books may be scholarly monographs or edited works, but we also welcome well-researched exhibition catalogues or primary source editions with comprehensive introductions. Contributions that address underexplored figures, themes, and (visual) sources from an interdisciplinary and historical perspective are particularly encouraged.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Stefan Einarson or to one of the series editors Aaron M. Bauer (Villanova University, PA, USA), Kay Etheridge (Gettysburg College, PA, USA), Dominik Hünniger (University of Hamburg, DE), Andreas Weber, (University of Twente, NL). For information on how to submit a book proposal, please consult the Brill Author Guide.