This volume, the first of a two-volume set, is the work of fourteen European and American scholars and focuses on the wider aspects of the Hundred Years. These essays range far afield from the traditional heartlands of Hundred Years War studies to investigate the influence of the conflict on Italy, the Low Countries, and Spain and on such topics as urban history, and the actualities of weapon use on the battlefield. A number of the essays in this collection seek to re-examine old but thorny questions long associated with the conflict, including the real immediate impact of gunpowder technology on siege warfare during the fourteenth century and the “purposeful” strategy of Henry V in staging and bringing about the battle of Agincourt in 1415.
With contributions by L.J. Andrew Villalon, María Teresa Ferrer i Mallol, Donald J. Kagay, Clara Estow, William P. Caferro, Sergio Boffa, Peter Michael Konieczny, Paul Solon, Manuel Sánchez Martínez, James E. Gilbert, Jane Marie Pinzino, Clifford J. Rogers, Kelly DeVries, and John Clement.

Winner of the 2014 Verbruggen Prize of De Re Militari (the Society for the Study of Medieval Military History) given annually for the best book on medieval military history.
This book takes a fresh look at the Hundred Years War by gathering the latest scholarship on several aspects of the conflict that have not been amply studied before and several that have become “gospel” by numerous scholarly treatments.
The collection focuses on the following subjects: (1) the Hundred Years War as a wide-ranging struggle that effected many European regions, (2) the battle of Agincourt and its political and emotional aftermath, (3) the Iberian theater of war that sprang from the main conflict, (4) the impact of the crossbow and longbow on the great battles of the conflict, (5) great leaders of the war, and (6) economic, literary, and psychological aspects of the conflict.
Contributors are: William P. Caferro, Megan Cassidy Welch, Kelly DeVries, Donald J. Kagay, Ilana Krug, Russell Mitchell, Steven Muhlberger, Clifford J. Rogers, L. B. Ross, Dana Sample, Wendy Turner, Richard Vernier, L. J. Andrew Villalon and David Whetham.

Winner of the 2014 Verbruggen Prize of De Re Militari (the Society for the Study of Medieval Military History) given annually for the best book on medieval military history.
Nájera (April 3, 1367), A Pyrrhic Victory for the Black Prince
In To Win and Lose a Medieval Battle: Nájera (April 3, 1367). A Pyrrhic Victory for the Black Prince, L.J. Andrew Villalon and Donald J. Kagay provide a full treatment of one of the major battles of the Hundred Years War, which, perhaps because it was fought in Spain, is lesser known to scholars and general readers. Drawing information from contemporary European chronicles and the massive documentary collections of Spanish and French archives, the authors have painstakingly investigated the Iberian and European background events to Nájera and have in minute detail laid out how the army of Enrique II of Castile (assisted by Bertand de Guesclin) and that of his half-brother, Pedro I of Castile (assisted by Edward, the Black Prince), clashed at Nájera on April 3, 1367.

Winner of the 2019 Brigadier General James L. Collins Jr. Prize, awarded by the U.S. Commission on Military History for the best book on military history published in 2017 or 2018. The awarding committee praised the volume as ‘a genuinely original scholarly contribution... comprehensive, balanced, and insightful... this 600-page magnum opus will significantly enhance our understanding of military history during a seminal period of human development.’

In: The Hundred Years War (Part II)
In: The Hundred Years War (Part III)
Aragon vs. Castile and the War of the Two Pedros
In Conflict in Fourteenth-Century Iberia, Kagay and Villalon trace the complicated economic military, political, and social background of the relationship of Iberia’s two greatest Christian states of the fourteenth century, Castile and the Crown of Aragon and their rulers, Pedro I (r. 1350-1366/69) and Pere III (r. 1336-1387). Besides chapters discussing the War of the Two Pedros (1356-1366) and the Castilian Civil War (1366-1369), the authors provide extended treatments of the strategical and tactical elements of the conflicts, the parliamentary, diplomatic, and governmental developments that occurred because of the conflicts as well as their social and political aftermaths. This work, along with authors’ earlier book on the battle of Nájera (1367) provides a much-needed review of Iberia’s violent fourteenth century.
In this work, the third volume of essays dealing with many understudied aspects of the Hundred Years War, American, British, and European scholars deal with the varied sources that reveal the lives of soldiers in the conflict as well as the development of strategy and generalship in the many theaters of the war. The authors also focus on real heroes and villains of the conflict as well as the war’s impact on regions as scattered as Wales, the Low Countries, Italy, Scotland and Spain.
Contributors are Adrian Bell, Anne Curry, Adam Chapman, Andy King, David Simpkin, Christopher Candy, Donald Kagay, William Caferro, David Hoornstra, Elena Odio, Daniel Franke, David Green, Philip Morgan, Sean McGlynn, Wendy Turner, Andrew Villalon, Aleksandra Pfau, Kelly DeVries, and Sergio Boffa.

Winner of the 2014 Verbruggen Prize of De Re Militari (the Society for the Study of Medieval Military History) given annually for the best book on medieval military history.