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Douwe (David) Runia

This study is the first volume in the new Philo of Alexandria Commentary Series. It contains a new English translation of Philo’s famous treatise On the creation of the cosmos (the first for seventy years), and the first ever commentary in English.
In this work the Jewish exegete and philosopher gives a selective exegesis of the Mosaic creation account and the events in Paradise as recorded in Genesis 1–3. It is the first preserved example of Hexaemeral literature, and had a profound influence on early Christian thought.
The commentary aims to make Philo’s thought accessible to readers such as graduate students who are just beginning to read him, but also contains much material that will be of interest to specialists in Hellenistic Judaism, ancient philosophy and patristic literature.
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Philo and the Church Fathers

A Collection of Papers

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Douwe (David) Runia

The extensive writings of the Jewish philosopher and exegete Philo of Alexandria (15 BCE to 50 CE) were preserved through the efforts of early Christians, who decided that these works could assist them in developing their own distinctive kind of thought. The present collection of papers, written from 1989 to 1994, is published as a companion volume to the author's monograph Philo in Early Christian Literature: A Survey (1993). The papers deal with various aspects of the process of reception that Philo received at the hands of the Church Fathers. Authors who are given particular attention are Athenagoras, Clement, Origen, Basil, Gregory of Nyssa, Isidore of Pelusium and Augustine. The papers also include a hitherto unpublished English translation of the author's inaugural lecture held at Utrecht in April 1992.
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Philo of Alexandria

An Annotated Bibliography 1987-1996, with Addenda for 1937-1986

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Douwe (David) Runia

This volume is a continuation of Philo of Alexandria: an Annotated Bibliography 1937-1986, published by Roberto Radice and David Runia in 1988 (second edition 1992). Prepared with the collaboration of the International Philo Bibliography Project, it contains a complete listing of all scholarly writings on Philo in all languages for the period 1987 to 1996. Part One lists texts, translations, commentaries etc. (75 items). Part Two contains critical studies (880 items). In part Three additional works for the years 1937-1986 are presented (170 items). In all cases a brief description of the contents of the contribution is given. Seven indices, including a detailed Index of subjects, complete the work.
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Douwe (David) Runia

It is a remarkable fact that the writings of Philo, the Jew from Alexandria, were preserved because they were taken up in the Christian tradition. But the story of how this process of reception and appropriation took place has never been systematically research.

In this book the author first examines how Philo's works are related to the New Testament and the earliest Chritian writing, and then how they were used by Greek and Latin church fathers up to 400 c.e., with special attention to the contributions of Clement, Origen, Didymus, Eusebius, Gregory of Nyssa, Ambrose, and Augustine.

Philo in Early Christian Literature is a valuable guide to the state of scholarly research on a subject that has thus far been investigated in a rather piecemeal fashion.

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Edited by Douwe (David) Runia

Brill's Annotated Bibliographies is a series offering a new set of bibliographical tools in the Classics. We welcome proposals for volumes in this series. The bibliographies would be up to 500 pp. in length and in English. Each volume should provide an exhaustive survey of the authoritative text editions, commentaries, translations, concordances, surveys and electronics tools, important or influential items of the secondary literature (indicating their position and impact in current debate). They should fill a need for scholars active in other (not necessarily adjacent) fields who require a quick and reliable access to the literature of the theme of the bibliography and would be of use to university teachers in preparing customised bibliographies for their students. Ideally, the bibliographies should also call attention to important Italian, German or French works, which are often overlooked by English-speaking students and even scholars.

The contents of most bibliographies will be as follows:
- a general introduction, outlining where possible the development of scholarship on the theme
- the bare facts: title, author, year of publication, type of work (article, book, etc.), size, publisher
- some description of the contents of the work
- an evaluation (in a minority of cases)
- a subject index (cf. Brisson's Plato bibliography in Lustrum)

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Aëtiana

The Method and Intellectual Context of a Doxographer, Volume III, Studies in the Doxographical Traditions of Ancient Philosophy

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Jaap Mansfeld and Douwe (David) Runia

Ancient doxography, particularly as distilled in the work on problems of physics by Aëtius, is a vital source for our knowledge of early Greek philosophy up to the first century BCE. But its purpose and method, and also its wider intellectual context, are by no means easy to understand. The present volume contains 19 essays written between 1989 and 2009 in which the authors grapple with various aspects of the doxographical tradition and its main representatives. The essays examine the origins of the doxographical method in the work of Aristotle and Theophrastus and also provide valuable insights into the works of other authors such as Epicurus, Chrysippus, Lucretius, Cicero, Philo of Alexandria and Seneca. The collection can be read as a companion collection to the two earlier volumes of Aëtiana published by the two authors in this series (1997, 2009).
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Aëtiana

The Method and Intellectual Context of a Doxographer, Volume I, The Sources

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Jaap Mansfeld and Douwe (David) Runia

In 1879 the young German scholar Hermann Diels published his celebrated Doxographi Graeci, (in which the major doxographical works of antiquity are collected and analysed). Diels' results have been foundational for the study of ancient philosophy ever since.
In their ground-breaking study the authors focus on the doxographer Aëtius, whose work Diels reconstructed from various later sources. First they examine the antecedents of Diels' Aëtian hypothesis. Then Diels' theory and especially the philological techniques used in its formulation are subjected to detailed analysis. The remainder of the volume offers a fresh examination of the sources for our knowledge for Aëtius. Diels' theory is revised and improved at significant points.
Subsequent volumes will examine the contents and methods of the doxographer and his antecedents in earlier Greek philosophy.
No scholar concerned with the history of ancient philosophy can afford to ignore this study.
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Philo of Alexandria

An annotated bibliography 1937-1986

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R. Radice and Douwe (David) Runia

The first author in which the traditions of Judaic thought and Greek philosophy flow together in a significant way is Philo of Alexandria.
This study presents a detailed and comprehensive examination of Philo's knowledge and utilization of the most popular philosophical work of his day, the Timaeus of Plato. A kind of "commentary" is given on all passages in Philo's oeuvre in which the Timaeus is used or referred to, followed by a "synthetic" account of the influence that it had on Philo's thought.
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Aëtiana (2 vols.) 

The Method and Intellectual Context of a Doxographer. Volume Two: The Compendium

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Jaap Mansfeld and Douwe (David) Runia

The theme of this study is the Doxography of problems in physics from the Presocratics to the early first century BCE attributed to Aëtius. Part I focuses on the argument of the compendium as a whole, of its books, of its sequences of chapters, and of individual chapters, against the background of Peripatetic and Stoic methodology. Part II offers the first full reconstruction in a single unified text of Book II, which deals with the cosmos and the heavenly bodies. It is based on extensive analysis of the relevant witnesses and includes listings of numerous doxographical-dialectical parallels in other ancient writings. This new treatment of the evidence supersedes Diels’ still dominant source-critical approach, and will prove indispensable for scholars in ancient philosophy.