Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Dr. Ansgar Frenken x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All

Among the many problems the council of Constance (1414–1418) had to solve the ending of the scism and the reuniting of the church was the one of highest priority. Furthermore, the assembly had to discuss some conflicts and disputes which have been a threat to ecclesiastical peace and a burden to the conciliar nations gathered in Constance. In this regard, the conflict with the Bohemian reform movement, personalized by Jan Hus, was just as part of the agenda as well as the question whether it was justifiable to eliminate a tyrant (the Petit case and the Falkenberg case).

In the article the author investigates the preconditions which enabled the council’s peacemaking policy to succeed. Furthermore, he discusses the methods and the capacity of the fathers to take an active role in peacekeeping as well as the posible reasons for which peace-making efforts could fail. While succeeding in reuniting the church the council mostly failed in its peacekeeping policy, particularily when divergent interests of the secular powers came into conflict. To appease a secular conflict by ecclesiastical efforts was accepted by the adversaries only if the gained an individual advantage. Otherwise they blocked all efforts of the fathers to resolve a conflict and to re-establish peace.

In: Annuarium Historiae Conciliorum
In: Annuarium Historiae Conciliorum
In: Annuarium Historiae Conciliorum
In: Annuarium Historiae Conciliorum