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Author: Augustin Dumont

Abstract

This paper aims at questioning the „continuity“ of the so-called Trieblehre through Fichte’s philosophy. First of all, the paper inquires into the function and status of the concept of drive (Trieb) during the Jena period. The paper shows how the concept of drive should be connected to the concept of feeling (Gefühl). Results of that inquiry are then confronted to some selected extracts of Fichte’s latest philosophy (particularly in the late theory of image). The paper finally demonstrates how the theory of drive in all of Fichte’s philosophy plays a decisive part in his theory of freedom.

In: Fichtes Bildtheorie im Kontext, Teil II
Author: Augustin Dumont

This paper aims at questioning the „continuity“ of the so-called Trieblehre through Fichte’s philosophy. First of all, the paper inquires into the function and status of the concept of drive (Trieb) during the Jena period. The paper shows how the concept of drive should be connected to the concept of feeling (Gefühl). Results of that inquiry are then confronted to some selected extracts of Fichte’s latest philosophy (particularly in the late theory of image). The paper finally demonstrates how the theory of drive in all of Fichte’s philosophy plays a decisive part in his theory of freedom.

In: Fichte Studien
Author: Stephen Dumont

Abstract

The degree of realism that Duns Scotus understood his formal distinction to have implied is a matter of dispute going back to the fourteenth century. Both modern and medieval commentators alike have seen Scotus's later, Parisian treament of the formal distinction as less realist in the sense that it would deny any extra-mentally separate formalities or realities. This less realist reading depends in large part on a question known to scholars only in the highly corrupt edition of Luke Wadding, where it is printed as the first of the otherwise spurious Quaestiones miscellaneae de formalitatibus. The present study examines this question in detail. Cited by Scotus's contemporaries as the Quaestio logica Scoti, we establish that it was a special disputation held by Scotus at Paris in response to criticisms of his use of the formal distinction in God, identify its known manuscripts, and provide an analysis based upon a corrected text, showing in particular the total unreliability of the Wadding edition. Our analysis shows that the Logica Scoti does not absolutely prohibit an assertion of formalities as correlates of the formal distinction, even in the divine Person, so long as their non-identity is properly qualified. That is, the positing of formalities does not of itself entail an unqualified or absolute distinction.

In: Vivarium
In: A Companion to James of Viterbo
In: Crustaceana
In: Crustaceana