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Author: E. Hijmans
With this analysis of Sol images, Steven E. Hijmans paints a new picture of the solar cult in ancient Rome. The paucity of literary evidence led Hijmans to prioritize visual sources, and he opens this study with a thorough discussion of the theoretical and methodological issues involved. Emphasizing the danger of facile equivalencies between visual and verbal meanings, his primary focus is Roman praxis, manifest in, for instance, the strict patterning of Sol imagery. These patterns encode core concepts that Sol imagery evoked when deployed, and in those concepts we recognize the bedrock of Rome’s understandings of the sun and his cult. Case studies illustrate these concepts in action and the final chapter analyzes the historical context in which previous, now discredited views on Sol could arise.
With this analysis of Sol images, Steven E. Hijmans paints a new picture of the solar cult in ancient Rome. The paucity of literary evidence led Hijmans to prioritize visual sources, and he opens this study with a thorough discussion of the theoretical and methodological issues involved. Emphasizing the danger of facile equivalencies between visual and verbal meanings, his primary focus is Roman praxis, manifest in, for instance, the strict patterning of Sol imagery. These patterns encode core concepts that Sol imagery evoked when deployed, and in those concepts we recognize the bedrock of Rome’s understandings of the sun and his cult. Case studies illustrate these concepts in action and the final chapter analyzes the historical context in which previous, now discredited views on Sol could arise.

This is volume II of a two-volume set.
With this analysis of Sol images, Steven E. Hijmans paints a new picture of the solar cult in ancient Rome. The paucity of literary evidence led Hijmans to prioritize visual sources, and he opens this study with a thorough discussion of the theoretical and methodological issues involved. Emphasizing the danger of facile equivalencies between visual and verbal meanings, his primary focus is Roman praxis, manifest in, for instance, the strict patterning of Sol imagery. These patterns encode core concepts that Sol imagery evoked when deployed, and in those concepts we recognize the bedrock of Rome’s understandings of the sun and his cult. Case studies illustrate these concepts in action and the final chapter analyzes the historical context in which previous, now discredited views on Sol could arise.

This is part I of a two-part set.

APULEIANA GRONINGANA III BY R. E. H. WESTENDORP BOERMA AND B. L. HIJMANS JR 1. Met. IV 1 (74, 12) sic enim primus aditus et sermo prolixus et oscula mutua quamvis asino sentire praestabant: "thus the first encounter and the torrent of talk and the mutual kisses gave me, ass though I was, to understand" i). Praestaye with inf. in the sense of 'provide', (give', 'offer' is late 2). It occurs also in Tert. adv. Heym. 8 (135, 4 and 5) et nemo qui pyaestat de suo uti, non in hoc superior est eo, cui praestat uti ; Petrus Chrysol.

In: Mnemosyne

396 APULEIUS MET. IV 1 (74, 16): LEVIGATOS OR LEVATOS ? The ass tells us how the robbers relieve the pack-animals from their burdens and allow them to graze in the adj oining meadow : iamque nos omni sarcina leuigatos in pratum proximum Passim libero Pastui tradidere ... Thus Helm. Of the mss. F has leuigatos, corrected to leuatos. The 'correction' consists of the expunction of uig and the addition, in the margin, of uatos. Text and correction are carried out by the same hand. cp retains leuigatos, but leuatos is, according to Robertson, the reading in some 14 th

In: Mnemosyne
Text, Introduction and Commentary