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Author: E. John Collins

Abstract

The chapter examines four twentieth-century Ghanaian neo-traditional musicmusic, neotraditional, in Ghana genres (GaGa language, Akan, Dagomba, and EweEwe) that are rural/communal performance traditions but have integrated elements of urban popular music. As a result, they reflect and articulate both ethnic identity and socio-politicalpolitis processes related to contemporary city life. It is thus inappropriate to apply to these neo-traditional genres older eurocentriceurocentrism ‘modernizationmodernization’ models that advocate just one form of developmental change: westernizationwesternization. Rather, the four music styles demonstrate ‘multiple modernitiesmultiple modernities’ that reflect the unique character of their particular ethnic communities; they emerged in the context of urban-rural feedback, in line with more recent developmental theories; and their performers are not passive recipients of change emanating from the ‘centre’, but ‘cultural brokers’ who actively select elements of commercial popular performance suitable for their communal music-making. These genres thus provide a test case for the newer ‘liberation’ and ‘glocalizationglocalization’ developmental theories that focus on how people on the ‘periphery’ adapt imported Western norms and technologies to their own indigenous folkways and national culture.

In: Philosophical Foundations of the African Humanities through Postcolonial Perspectives
In: Sapiential Perspectives: Wisdom Literature in Light of the Dead Sea Scrolls
In: Sapiential Perspectives: Wisdom Literature in Light of the Dead Sea Scrolls
In: Sapiential Perspectives: Wisdom Literature in Light of the Dead Sea Scrolls
In: Sapiential Perspectives: Wisdom Literature in Light of the Dead Sea Scrolls
In: Sapiential Perspectives: Wisdom Literature in Light of the Dead Sea Scrolls
In: Sapiential Perspectives: Wisdom Literature in Light of the Dead Sea Scrolls