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In: The Global Phenomenon of Family-Owned or Managed Universities
In: Education beyond Europe
Chapter 3 Family Involvement in University Management
In: The Global Phenomenon of Family-Owned or Managed Universities

Abstract

The impact of COVID-19 on higher education is not unlike changing circumstances globally. Universities and colleges have reorganized and retrenched services and academic programs, delayed school openings, closed facilities, and in particular emphasized technology in learning. Distance and hybrid learning modalities are on the rise and in many cases replacing face-to-face instruction as a safer alternative. In Korea, most of these changes have occurred within a framework of policy guidelines established by the government. This chapter sheds light on these changes, and importantly government strategies employed to deal with the impact of COVID, as an opportunity to investigate the higher education-government relationship, especially concerning the entrenched challenges faced by the private higher education sector. While Korea’s higher education system in general has benefited considerably under the government’s direction to manage COVID-related complications, the government’s rigid regulatory machinery restricts institutional autonomy in ways that make it difficult for periphery institutions, which are mostly private in status, to not only manage the pandemic effectively, but also remain financially viable in perpetuity. This chapter closes by recommending several policy directions with the aim of improving particularly the circumstances of private institutions.

In: Higher Education and the COVID-19 Pandemic
The focus of this volume is on illuminating how local educational traditions developed in particular contexts around the world before or during the encounter with European early modern culture. In this vein, this volume breaks from the common narrative of educational historiography privileging the imposition of European structures and its consequences on local educational traditions. Such a narrative lends to historiographical prejudice that fosters a distorted image of indigenous educational cultures as “historyless,” as if history was brought to them merely through the influence of European models. Fifteen multi-disciplinary scholars globally have contributed with surveys and perspectives on the history of local traditions in countries from around the globe before their own modernities.

Contributors include: Guochang Shen, Yongyan Wang, Xia Shen, Gaétan Rappo, Sunghwan Hwang, Jan S. Aritonang, Mere Skerrett, Saiyid Zaheer Husain Jafri, Zackery M. Heern, Judith Francis Zeitlin, Layla Jorge Teixeira Cesar, Mustafa Gündüz, Igor Fedyukin, Edit Szegedi, Inese Runce, Sigurður Gylfi Magnússon, and Davíð Ólafsson.
Chapter 30 Intelligent Internationalization, Online Learning, and Interculturality
In: Intelligent Internationalization
In: Education beyond Europe
In: Education beyond Europe
In: Education beyond Europe
In: Education beyond Europe