Edwin Egede

Abstract

The Law of the Sea Convention requires that effective participation of developing States Parties in activities in the deep seabed beyond national jurisdiction (the Area) should be promoted having due regard to their special interests and needs (especially those of landlocked and geographically disadvantaged states). This article examines the difficulties in actual, direct and effective participation by African states in deep seabed mining and possible co-operative endeavours that African states may embark upon to overcome some of these constraints in order to advance the prospects of their actual, direct and effective participation in deep seabed mining.

Edwin Egede

Abstract

Nigeria is a coastal state located strategically on the West Coast of Africa in the Gulf of Guinea. After gaining independence in 1960 it enacted legislation in 1967 on its territorial waters, which has been amended twice, in 1971 and 1998. After participating in the Third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS III) it became a party to the 1982 Convention on 14 August 1986. This article examines the laws governing the Nigerian territorial waters vis-à-vis the LOSC provisions on the territorial sea with a view to pinpointing how far these laws are in compliance with the relevant provisions of the LOSC.

Edwin Egede

Abstract

Brazil on 17 May 2004 became the second State to make its submission to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS) as required by Article 76 of the Law of the Sea Convention (LOSC). The Brazilian submission assumes particular significance as the first submission to the CLCS by a developing State member of the Group of 77. This article seeks to examine the Brazilian submission vis-à-vis the provisions of Article 76 of LOSC.