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Author: Edwin Etieyibo

This paper employs the conceptual-analytical method to analyse literature and news reports on disabilities, and international legal documents and instruments on human rights and the rights of persons with disabilities to which Nigeria is a signatory. This study is conducted in the context of exclusionary and discriminatory practices against persons with disabilities in Nigeria. The practices and rights that are examined are in the areas of education and accessibility with regard to adults and children with disabilities, work and employment, and the employment or use of children with disabilities in alms-soliciting. The paper’s broad objective in critically discussing these practices is to make a case for why and how they violate the rights of persons with disabilities.

Open Access
In: Afrika Focus
Author: Edwin Etieyibo

Abstract

This chapter is situated within the context of the discourse on disability and discriminatory practices against persons with disabilities in Nigeria and the putative violations of the rights of persons with disabilities that emerge from such practices. To this extent one can interpret the chapter as one that falls within the arena of social justice insofar as social justice can be construed not just about the distribution of wealth, opportunities, and privileges within a society but also about rights or human rights and equality and the treatment of people. Some of the discriminatory practices that it takes up include ritual trafficking and killing of people with mental illness, oculocutaneous albinism and angular kyphosis, raping of women with mental illness, and exclusionary practices in areas of education, work and employment, accessibility, safety and accommodation. The central idea that I work with is one that situates these practices within the nub of the norm of social justice. And insofar as this norm concerns the fair and egalitarian allocation of resources in society (e.g. rights, privileges, advantages and disadvantages, etc.), these practices and the lukewarm response by Nigeria to the violations of the rights of persons with disabilities can be said to be acts that perpetuate the marginalisation of persons with disabilities. As part of its conceptual-analytical methodology, the chapter draws significantly on newspaper articles and previous research on disability as well as international and local human rights instruments to argue that Nigeria is not doing enough in ensuring the fair and equal treatment of people with disabilities.

In: Africa’s Radicalisms and Conservatisms
Volume I: Politics, Poverty, Marginalization and Education
With Africa as its point of reference and departure, this volume examines why and how the two concepts – radicalisms and conservatisms – should not be taken as mere binaries around which to organize knowledge. It demonstrates that these concepts have multiple and diverse meanings as perceived and understood from different disciplinary vantage points, hence, the deliberate pluralization of the terms. The essays show what happens when one juxtaposes the two concepts and how they are easily intertwined when different peoples’ lived experiences of poverty, political and social alienation, education, intolerance, youth activism, social (in)justice, violence, etc. across the length and breadth of Africa are brought to bear on our understandings of these two particularisms.

Contributors are: Adekunle Victor Owoyomi, Adeshina Francis Akindutire, Adewale O. Owoseni, Bright Nkrumah, Clement Chipenda, Ebenezer Babajide Ishola, Edwin Etieyibo, Israel Oberedjemurho Ugoma, Jonah Uyieh, Jonathan O. Chimakonam, Madina Tlostanova, Maduka Enyimba, Muchaparara Musemwa, Odirin Omiegbe, Obvious Katsaura, Olufunke Olufunsho Adegoke, Peter Kwaja, Philip Akporduado Edema, Tafadzwa Chevo, and Temitope Owolabi.
In: Africa’s Radicalisms and Conservatisms
In: Africa’s Radicalisms and Conservatisms
In: Africa’s Radicalisms and Conservatisms
In: Africa’s Radicalisms and Conservatisms
In: Africa’s Radicalisms and Conservatisms