Search Results

Author: Edwin Jurriëns
From Monologue to Dialogue: Radio and Reform in Indonesia analyses how radio journalism since the late 1990s has been shaped by and contributed to Reformasi, or the ambition of democratizing Indonesian politics, economy and society. The book examines ideas and practices such as independent journalism, peace journalism, meta-journalism, virtual interactivity, talk-back radio and community radio, which have all been designed to renew audience interest in media and societal affairs. It pays special attention to radio programmes that enable hosts, experts, listeners and other participants to discuss and negotiate the very rules and boundaries of Indonesia’s newly acquired media freedom. The author argues that these contemporary programmes provide dialogic alternatives to the official New Order discourse dominated by monologism.
The Artistic Representation of Globalization in the Electronic Media of West Java
Author: Edwin Jurriëns
Cultural travel and migrancy examines how people in West Java use modern media such as radio, television, and cassettes to give expression to their thoughts and feelings about problems of contemporary life. It describes artistic approaches to globalization, one of the problems that has been felt most pressing during the late New Order and early Reformation. Situating itself at this remarkable turning-point in Indonesian history, it shows that local artists have not been mere victims or products of globalization, but virtual migrants who self-consciously steer the electronic media on their worldwide travels. The book gives an analysis of relevant case-studies and historical debates on culture and representation in Indonesia and the West, and also provides an overview of early developments and recent trends in the Indonesian and West Javanese media landscapes. With its focus on Sundanese language and culture, it is a pioneering and gap-filling complement to the existing literature on media.
Author: Edwin Jurriëns

This article focuses on the oeuvre of Indonesian journalist, essayist, and literary author Veven Sp. Wardhana (1959–2013). This oeuvre constitutes a critical and creative documentation of the role of the media, particularly television, in Indonesia’s transition from authoritarianism to democracy. The article will contextualize Wardhana’s work by comparing it with the activities of the independent Indonesian Broadcasting Commission and the broader media watch and media literacy movement. Wardhana’s writings stand out for their identification of the recurring and interrelated issues in Indonesian media history; conceptualization of Indonesia as a televised world; and creative reworking of television in an experimental literary form. Unlike the formal mechanisms of media regulation, his work approaches the media not merely in terms of institutions and content, but rather as socio-cultural environments and ecologies. The author argues that the work of creative actors like Wardhana could constitute an answer to the lack of resources in Indonesian Media and Cultural Studies departments.

Author: Edwin Jurriëns

This article discusses Indonesian artist Krisna Murti, whose video art and other creative work can be seen as a form of televisual metadiscourse. Murti’s artistic type of televisual metadiscourse provides insight into the commercial and ideological mechanisms behind the mass media industry; the cultural-technological features of various media; the historical dimensions of different genres of representation; the position of the artist and audience in processes of mediation; and alternative forms of intermediality and interactivity. Beyond merely television critique, Murti’s work presents an alternative vision of mixed environments where media and people harmoniously coexist and interact with each other. The author argues that this attempt at promoting pleasant, effective and sustainable communication environments could be seen as the media equivalent of ecology.

Author: Edwin Jurriëns

Abstract

This article uses a critical and historical perspective to examine some of the achievements of Indonesian community media, the problems they have encountered, as well as the solutions they are offering. It analyses the similarities and differences with earlier genres with an explicit participatory agenda, including certain forms of LEKRA literature and art of the 1950s and 1960s, ‘people’s theatre’ since the 1970s, and ‘conscientization art’ since the 1980s. One of the main challenges for contemporary community media has been to reconcile class differences in the collaboration between media or art facilitators and local communities. These and other factors have affected the accessibility, distribution, sustainability and reach of their ideas, activities and outputs. The article demonstrates how facilitators and practitioners have tried to solve some of these problems through the exploration of alternative media networks, formats and content.

In: From Monologue to Dialogue
In: From Monologue to Dialogue
In: From Monologue to Dialogue
In: From Monologue to Dialogue
In: From Monologue to Dialogue