Scientific Naturalism and Esoteric Discourse 1900 - 1939
Author: Egil Asprem
The Problem of Disenchantment offers a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to the intellectual history of science, religion, and “the occult” in the early 20th century. By developing a new approach to Max Weber’s famous idea of a “disenchantment of the world”, and drawing on an impressively diverse set of sources, Egil Asprem opens up a broad field of inquiry that connects the histories of science, religion, philosophy, and Western esotericism.

Parapsychology, occultism, and the modern natural sciences are usually viewed as distinct cultural phenomena with highly variable intellectual credentials. In spite of this view, Asprem demonstrates that all three have met with similar intellectual problems related to the intelligibility of nature, the relation of facts to values, and the dynamic of immanence and transcendence, and solved them in comparable terms.
Author: Egil Asprem

Abstract

L'une des questions centrales qui se posent en matière d'ésotérisme occidental moderne porte sur l'attrait persistant de la magie; comment la magie a-t-elle survécu au “désenchantement du monde”? Une explication tentante a été que l'émergence de la “magie occultiste”, fondée sur les écrits d'Eliphas Lévi (1810-1875) et les enseignements de l'Ordre Hermétique de la Golden Dawn (créé en 1888) en particulier, ont eu pour effet une “psychologisation” de la magie. Le fait d'interpréter les pratiques magiques comme des techniques psychologiques, et le commerce avec des entités ésotériques comme une manipulation d'états intérieurs, psychologiques, plutôt que comme un commerce avec des êtres spirituels existant réellement, a permis à des modernes possédant une bonne culture et appartenant à une classe supérieure à la classe moyenne, de maintenir à la fois leur croyance à la magie, et leur intégrité rationnelle. En présentant une étude de cas, celui d'un des occultistes modernes ayant exercé le plus d'influence, à savoir Aleister Crowley (1875-1947), cet article cherche à montrer que “la thèse de la psychologisation” ne résiste pas entièrement à l'examen. Feront l'objet d'une mention particulière le système magique de Crowley, présenté comme un “Illuminisme scientifique”, ainsi que le rôle et à l'attrait de la science dans ce système. Contrairement à la thèse de la psychologisation, laquelle, comme on en traitera, représente une sorte d' “escapisme psychologique”, Crowley ne cherchait pas à dissocier ses croyances magiques de ses croyances rationnelles en les faisant passer dans le champ de la psychologie et des états intérieurs; au lieu de cela, influencé qu'il était par les idéaux du naturalisme scientifique il a cherché à concevoir une méthode naturaliste permettant de critiquer, de tester et de raffiner rationnellement la pratique magique. En somme, on s'attachera à montrer que le système de Crowley représente un pas en direction de la naturalisation plutôt que vers la psychologisation de la magie. On présentera une lecture serrée de certaines des idées de Crowley portant sur le rapport entre science et magie, et on procédera aussi à une contextualisation historique dans laquelle on s'attachera spécialement à traiter des rapports entretenus par Crowley avec des courants intellectuels marquants au sein desquels on s'intéressait à cette question (notamment, la Society for Psychical Research, Sir James Frazer, ainsi que des philosophes naturalistes—de T.H. Huxley à Henry Maudsley).

In: Aries
In: Aries
In: Aries
Author: Egil Asprem

The imagination is central to esoteric practices, but so far scholars have shown little interest in exploring cognitive theories of how the imagination works. The only exception is Tanya Luhrmann’s interpretive drift theory and related research on mental imagery cultivation, which has been used to explain the subjective persuasiveness of modern ritual magic. This article draws on recent work in the neuroscience of perception in order to develop a general theory of kataphatic (that is, imagery based) practice that goes beyond the interpretive drift theory. Mental imagery is intimately linked with perception. Drawing on “predictive coding” theory, the article argues that kataphatic practices exploit the probabilistic, expectation-based way that the brain processes sensory information and creates models (perceptions) of the world. This view throws light on a wide range of features of kataphatic practices, from their contemplative and cognitive aspects, to their social organization and demographic make-up, to their pageantry and material culture. By connecting readily observable features of kataphatic practice to specific neurocognitive mechanisms related to perceptual learning and cognitive processing of mental imagery, the predictive coding paradigm also creates opportunities for combining historical research with experimental approaches in the study of religion. I illustrate how this framework may enrich the study of Western esotericism in particular by applying it to the paradigmatic case of “astral travel” as it has developed from the Golden Dawn tradition of ritual magic, especially in the work of Aleister Crowley.

In: Aries
Author: Egil Asprem

This article responds to Hans Kippenberg's, Willem Drees's, and Ann Taves's commentaries on my book, The Problem of Disenchantment. It presents an overview of the key arguments of the book, clarifies its use of Problemgeschichte to reconceptualize Weber's notion of disenchantment, and discusses issues in the history and philosophy of science and religion. Finally, it elaborates on the use of recent cognitive theory in intellectual history. In particular, it argues that work in event cognition can help us reframe Weber's interpretive sociology and deepen the principle of methodological individualism. This helps us get a better view of what the ‘problems’ of Problemgeschichte really are, how they emerge, and why some of them may reach broader significance.

In: Journal of Religion in Europe
Author: Egil Asprem

Research on cultural transfers between science and religion has not paid enough attention to popular science. This article develops models that grasp the complexities of the epidemiology of science-based representations in non-scientific contexts by combining tools from the cognitive science of religion, the history, sociology, and philosophy of science, and the study of new religious movements. The popularization of science is conceptualized as a process of cognitive optimization, which starts with the communication efforts of scientists in science-internal forums and accelerates in popular science. The popularization process narrows the range of scientific representations that reach the public domain in structured ways: it attracts minimally counterintuitive representations, minimizes the massively counterintuitive, and re-represents (or translates) hard-to-process concepts in inferentially rich metaphors. This filtered sample trigger new processes of meaning-making as they are picked up and re-embedded in new cultural contexts.

In: Method & Theory in the Study of Religion