Search Results

Within the Context of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women
Islam and women’s human rights entertain an uneasy relationship. Much has been written on the subject. This volume addresses it from a new perspective. It attempts to define some basis for constructive dialogue and interaction in the context of international law and, more precisely, in the context of participation of many Muslim States in the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women.
Having discovered a constructive potential in both Islam and women’s human rights, the author concentrates on the role which international law should play in promoting dialogue and constructive interaction. This is done mainly through analysis of the regime of reservations and of the practice of reservations developed in the context of Muslim States’ participation in the CEDAW.
The basic thesis defended is the following: Islam as articulated in the practice of States and women’s human rights, as reflected in international instruments, are both results of human activity. Their analysis in this study reveals more commonalities than one might expect. International law should be more attentive to their voices and more innovative in using these commonalities in order to promote constructive dialogue between them and thus help to improve the situation of women suffering from discrimination and inequalities.
How does globalisation affect the ability of human rights to constrain power? This is the central question of this volume that tackles the issue from a variety of perspectives. It covers such branches of international law and human rights as diplomatic protection, powers of the UN Security Council, responsibility of international organisations, accountability of multinational corporations, third-generation rights, law of armed conflict, and state sovereignty. The contributions problematize the role of human rights and call for rethinking of the structure and functioning of human rights. The contributions adopt a variety of disciplinary perspectives that all elucidate difficulties human rights face in a globalised world and suggest ways forward.

Abstract

International constitutionalism relates to processes of limiting traditionally unrestricted powers of states as ultimate subjects, law-makers and law-enforcers of international law. Human rights occupy a central, but very confusing and confused role in the theorisation of international constitutionalism. If feminist scholars have criticised the inadequacies, shortcomings and gaps of international law of human rights at least since 1991, the doctrine of international law theorising constitutionalisation of international law until now has remained blind to these critiques idealising human rights and often using them as the ultimate legitimating factor. Thus, legitimacy and legality become confused and the distinction between them blurred in the doctrine of international constitutionalism. This in turn creates a danger of failure of the constitutionalists project itself, as it will serve to reinforce existing inadequacies and gaps in human rights protection. To illustrate this argument, I discuss some examples related to the protection of women's and migrants' rights. In order to avoid this dangerous development, I argue that international lawyers theorising international constitutionalism shall adopt an adequate, inclusive notion of legitimacy. In order to develop this adequate understanding of legitimacy, they should first take seriously feminist and other critiques of international human rights law and international law more generally. In the final parts of this article I develop my own more detailed proposals on the future of legitimacy and international constitutionalism. In doing so, I draw on the 'self-correcting learning process' developed in the writings of Jürgen Habermas, 'democracy to come' and more general views on the nature of sovereignty and human rights expressed by Jacques Derrida, as well as Levinasian 'responsibility-to-and-for-the-Other'.

In: International Community Law Review

Abstract

The article proposes a new reading of the reservations regime to human rights treaties. The practice developed by states in relation to the reservations regime is analysed and presented as a constitution-making process. This new vision is based on the notion of the reservations dialogue as presented and developed by the Special Rapporteur of the International Law Commission on reservations to treaties. However, the article also proposes a wide reading of the practice of the reservations dialogue using examples from the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. Based on this analysis, the author formulates some proposals as to a more adequate development of the reservations dialogue and the reservations regime. A development which will favour the formation of inclusive international human rights as a basis for a future international constitution accepted as legitimate by all members of the international community.

In: International Community Law Review

The article proposes a new reading of the reservations regime to human rights treaties. The practice developed by states in relation to the reservations regime is analysed and presented as a constitution-making process. This new vision is based on the notion of the reservations dialogue as presented and developed by the Special Rapporteur of the International Law Commission on reservations to treaties. However, the article also proposes a wide reading of the practice of the reservations dialogue using examples from the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. Based on this analysis, the author formulates some proposals as to a more adequate development of the reservations dialogue and the reservations regime. A development which will favour the formation of inclusive international human rights as a basis for a future international constitution accepted as legitimate by all members of the international community.

In: International Community Law Review

Abstract

The article addresses the use of notions of gender equality and non-discrimination in the discussions concerning the practice of Islamic veiling by the European Court of Human Rights as well as by French authorities in relation to the recent adoption of the law banning full face veils in public spaces in France. The author argues that the use of the rhetoric of gender equality without the required knowledge and understanding of the justifications for and discussions about this practice existing within Islam is in both cases very inadequate and leads to results opposite to those they intended to promote. Based on insights into the discussions of Muslims about the practice of veiling the author makes some proposals for a more adequate approach to this practice both from the point of view of women’s status as well as from the point of view of relationship between Islam and the West.

In: Religion & Human Rights

Abstract

This chapter describes the context and basic assumptions of the volume. It summarises the main arguments of each chapter explaining the structure of the volume and connections between chapters. It also draws general conclusions.

In: Human Rights and Power in Times of Globalisation
In: Human Rights and Power in Times of Globalisation
In: Human Rights and Power in Times of Globalisation
In: Human Rights and Power in Times of Globalisation