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In: The Scottish Sixties
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Abstract

Recently, many debates in sociology and politics have focussed on the potential decline of the nation-state in an increasingly globalised world. To what extent might such new configurations of power have an impact on Scottish literary studies? To accommodate these developments, Scottish studies must become more conscious of its own boundaries.

In: Scotland in Theory
Volume Editors: and
Although a number of publications have appeared in recent years marking the importance of the ‘swinging sixties’, many tend to be personally reflective in nature and London-centric in their coverage. By contrast, The Scottish Sixties: Reading, Rebellion, Revolution? addresses this misrepresentation and in so doing fills a gap in both Scottish and British literary and cultural studies. Through a series of academic analyses based on archival records, ephemera and work produced during the 1960s, this volume focuses, uniquely, on Scotland. In its concern with some of the key figures of Scottish cultural life, the book considers amongst other topics the implications of censorship, the role of little magazines in shaping cultural debates, the radical nature of much Scottish literature of the time, developments in the avant-garde and the role of experiment in theatre, film, TV, fine art and music.
In: The Scottish Sixties
In: The Scottish Sixties
In: The Scottish Sixties
In: The Scottish Sixties
Volume Editors: and
Scotland in Theory offers new ways of reading Scottish texts and culture within the context of an altered political framework and a changing sense of national identity. With the re-establishment of a Parliament in Edinburgh, issues of nationality and nationalism can be looked at afresh. It is timely now to revisit representations of Scottish culture in cinematography and literature, and also to examine aspects of gender, sexuality and ideology that have shaped how Scots have come to understand themselves. Established and younger critics use a variety of theoretical approaches here to catch an authentic sense of a post-modern Scotland in the process of change. Literature and the arts provide radical ways of knowing what Scotland, in theory, could become. The collection will be of interest to teachers and students of Scottish and English literature, literary theory, cultural and media analysis, and the history of ideas. Contributors include Eleanor Bell, Kasia Boddy, Cairns Craig, Thomas Docherty, Christopher Harvie, Ellen Raïssa-Jackson, Willy Maley, Gavin Miller, Tom Nairn, Sarah Neely, Laurence Nicoll, Berthold Schoene, Anne McManus Scriven, A.J.P. Thomson, Ronald Turnbull, Christopher Whyte.
In: Scotland in Theory