Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for

  • Author or Editor: Elena Canadelli x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Journal of the Material and Visual History of Science (Formerly: Annali dell'Istituto e Museo di storia della scienza di Firenze)
Editor-in-Chief: Elena Canadelli
2020 Impact Factor: 0,325
5-Year Impact Factor: 0,347

Nuncius is a peer-reviewed, international journal devoted to the historical role of material and visual culture in science. Nuncius publishes 3 issues per year.
Nuncius explores the material sources of scientific endeavor, such as scientific instruments and collections, the specific settings of experimental practice, and the interactions between sciences and arts. The materiality of science is a fundamental source for the understanding of its history, and the visual representation of its concepts and objects is equally crucial. Founded in 1976, Nuncius was originally published as Annali dell'Istituto e Museo di Storia della Scienza.
Nuncius publishes original articles, unpublished primary sources (Documenta inedita), and occasionally special focus sections to emerging historiographic fields and new methods of research. A rich book and review article section covers the main contributions to the field.
The main language of the journal is English, although submissions in other languages can also be considered. Nuncius is published under the auspices of the Museo Galileo in Florence ( www.museogalileo.it).

For Author Guidelines click here.
  • Print + Online €635.00$736.00
  • Print Only €582.00$675.00
  • Online only €529.00$614.00
  • For further information, contact your sales manager
In: Nuncius
Author: ELENA CANADELLI

Abstract

<title> ABSTRACT </title>From the second half of the 19th century up to the first part of the 20th century the drawings of Mars by the Italian astronomer Giovanni Schiaparelli became the centre of an international controversy concerning the existence of canals and the hypothetical habitability of the red planet. These images also generated a full impact on the popular culture of the time. This essays follows the scientific representations of Mars by Schiaparelli (drawings of discs and maps) from their birth in the hands of the astronomy community up to their growing old in the hands of scientific popularizers such as Camille Flammarion and science fiction writers such as Herbert George Wells. With its seas and canyons Mars turned into the ideal background for scientific and exotic romanticism, offering a suitable setting for novels and tales. The core question crossed paths with the contemporary early 20th century debate raging on about the evolutionary theory. The study of Mars moved from astronomy to extraterrestrial physiology, biology, meteorology and geography: astronomical images then became imaginary portraits of Martians and artificial Martian landscapes.

In: Nuncius