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Military Bases and the Evolution of Foreign Policy in Egypt's New Kingdom
Author: Ellen Morris
This volume traces the evolution of New Kingdom foreign policy in Syria-Palestine, Nubia, and Libya through an analysis of the distribution of Egyptian military bases over time and across borders. Archaeological and textual evidence pertaining to fortress-towns, forts, border checkpoints, and military headquarters is analyzed in order to illuminate the ever-shifting strategies employed by the Egyptian government to rule its subject territories. Exhaustive in its scope and illustrated throughout with numerous maps and architectural plans, this book should interest Egyptologists, Near Eastern archaeologists and historians, as well as anthropologists engaged in the comparative study of early empires and military tactics.
In: The Architecture of Imperialism
In: The Architecture of Imperialism
In: The Architecture of Imperialism
In: The Architecture of Imperialism
In: The Architecture of Imperialism
In: The Architecture of Imperialism
Author: Ellen Morris

Abstract

To judge from wisdom literature and artistic production, the ideal man in pharaonic Egypt was as polite and even-tempered as he was well groomed. This article examines the evidence for warrior burials from periods when the state was decentralized or relatively weak and argues that conceptions of manhood in fact oscillated between an irenic ideal and a more violent counterpart. Drawing upon comparative case studies and advice given by Niccolò Machiavelli to his prince, I argue that hegemonic masculinity in Egypt did not simply reflect the character of the times. Rather, rulers actively promoted the type of masculinity that best served their purpose. To an ambitious local ruler engaged in enlarging his core territory, it was beneficial to appeal to and encourage ideals of valor among potential soldiers and supporters. Once peace had been established, however, violent masculinities proved disruptive. Based on internal evidence as well as observations of authoritarian governments that aimed similarly to solidify their power and pacify their realms, I suggest that pharaohs and their advisors likely employed five specific strategies to neutralize potential competitors and transform an honor-bound warrior aristocracy into courtiers and bureaucrats.

In: Journal of Egyptian History
Managing Editor: J.J. Shirley
The Journal of Egyptian History aims to encourage and stimulate a focused debate on writing and interpreting Egyptian history ranging from the Neolithic foundations of Ancient Egypt to its modern reception. It covers all aspects of Ancient Egyptian history (political, social, economic, and intellectual) and of modern historiography about Ancient Egypt (methodologies, hermeneutics, interplay between historiography and other disciplines, and history of modern Egyptological historiography).

The journal is open to contributions in English, German, and French.
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