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In: Creation Stories in Dialogue: The Bible, Science, and Folk Traditions
A Semiotic Theory and Method of Analysis Applied to the Story of the Garden of Eden
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Biblical Hebrew grammar was until recently concentrated on the morpho-syntax within sentence boundaries. In the past few decades text-syntactic theories have been developed. At the conference Narrative Syntax and the Hebrew Bible (Tilburg 1996) six eminent scholars presented both a paper on Hebrew syntax and a workshop in which Exodus 19-24 or 1 Samuel 1 was studied. Both kinds of contributions are collected in this volume. They tend to lead towards one conclusion: traditional sentence-grammar and text-syntactic studies should not exclude, but include each other. The verb forms, word-order and other syntactic features need to be studied as functioning at more than one level. A combination of a morpho-syntactic study at the sentence level and a text-syntactic approach is thus defended.

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Semantic Studies of Genesis 1-11
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By carefully analyzing the text-semantic features of the texts of Genesis 1-11, this book offers a quite new perspective on the primaeval history. The first part of the book examines Genesis 1-11, which is usually read as a creation story concerning the human being in relation to God, in which the human being falls from bad to worse. In these text-semantic studies it is shown that such is not the case, especially in the rather exciting analysis of the story of the Tower of Babel. In the second part of the book the methodological framework of these text-semantic studies is presented.
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Abstract

The widespread opinion that the verb 'innâ in the Pi'el refers to "rape" or "sexual abuse" is not acceptable. It suffers from a lack of analysis of all the biblical material and of the distribution of 'innâ with a female object in the Hebrew Bible. A semantic analysis of the lexical collocations, of the word order and of the textual occurrences in which 'innâ functions shows that this verb is used as an evaluative term in a juridical context denoting a spatial movement downwards in a social sense and should be translated as "debase". By implication, the verb 'innâ in Gen. xxxiv 2 does not describe Shechem's rape or sexual abuse of Dinah, but evaluates Shechem's previously described actions as a debasement of Dinah from a social-juridical point of view.

In: Vetus Testamentum
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Abstract

Because Gen. 9:8-17 uses the word qĕšĕt in relation to the deity and to the clouds, the inference has been made in biblical scholarship that the text refers to a rainbow. The plausibility of this inference is tested in this article. Attention is given to the various linguistic aspects of this word in the Hebrew Bible and to the specific textual composition of Gen. 9:8-17 as well as to the broader ancient Near Eastern framework established by comparative literary and iconographic evidence. The conclusion is reached that the word qĕšĕt designates in Gen. 9:8-17 a warrior’s bow which represents both the deity’s might and power as well as his willingness to transfer his power over the earth to those living on it.

In: Vetus Testamentum
In: Words become Worlds
In: Narrative Syntax and the Hebrew Bible
In: Synchronic or Diachronic?