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In: The Horse as Cultural Icon
The lives of William Cavendish, first duke of Newcastle, and his family including, centrally, his second wife, Margaret Cavendish, are intimately bound up with the overarching story of seventeenth-century England: the violently negotiated changes in structures of power that constituted the Civil Wars, and the ensuing Commonwealth and Restoration of the monarchy. William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle, and his Political, Social and Cultural Connections: Authority, Authorship and Aristocratic Identity in Seventeenth Century England brings together a series of interrelated essays that present William Cavendish, his family, household and connections as an aristocratic, royalist case study, relating the intellectual and political underpinnings and implications of their beliefs, actions and writings to wider cultural currents in England and mainland Europe.
In: Authority, Authorship and Aristocratic Identity in Seventeenth-Century England
In: Authority, Authorship and Aristocratic Identity in Seventeenth-Century England
In: The Horse as Cultural Icon
The Real and the Symbolic Horse in the Early Modern World
In modern Western society horses appear as unexpected visitors: not quite exotic, but not familiar either. This estrangement between humans and horses is a recent one since, until the 1930s, horses were fully present in the everyday world. Indeed, as well as performing utilitarian functions, horses possessed iconic appeal. But, despite the importance of horses, scholars have paid little attention to their lives, roles and meanings. This volume helps to redress the balance. It considers the value that the influential elite placed on horses as essential accompaniments to their way of life and as status symbols, as well as the role that horses played in society as a whole and the people who used and cared for them.

Contributors include Greg Bankoff, Pia F. Cuneo, Louise Hill Curth, Amanda Eisemann, Jennifer Flaherty, Ian F. MacInnes, Richard Nash, Gavin Robinson, Elizabeth Anne Socolow, Sandra Swart, Elizabeth M. Tobey, Andrea Tonni, and Elaine Walker.
In: The Horse as Cultural Icon
In: The Horse as Cultural Icon