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Elspeth Guild

Abstract

What duties do states have to individuals who suffer as a result of armed conflict? While the International Court of Justice has stated that the protection offered by human rights conventions does not cease in case of armed conflict, it has not provided any clarity on how this is to be interpreted. This article examines how the European Court of Human Rights has interpreted the duty of a state to guarantee human rights to persons in whose territory the state is engaged in armed conflict.

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Elspeth Guild

Immigration law continues to be an issue of substantial interest in the European Union. The institutions and the Member States are formulating the type of immigration law which the Union will have following the substantial move of competence in the field from Member State level to the Union with the amendments to the EC Treaty introduced by the Treaty of Amsterdam in 1999. This is a particularly important period within which to take stock of the existing immigration law of the European Union and how it has been developed. In order to understand the current law and lay the foundations for the future, a historical analysis of the development of European Union immigration law is needed.
This volume charts the development of European Community immigration law from the conclusion of the EEC Treaty to the present day, first focussing on the development of the law relating to Community nationals and their third country national dependents, then looking at the extension of Community immigration law to third country nationals through agreements between their states of origin and the EC. Special attention is given to the rights of Turkish workers under the agreement between Turkey and the EC and the possibilities of residence and economic activity for nationals of the Central and Eastern European countries under the Europe Agreements. The centre of analysis of this book is the individual migrant: what are the rights and duties of the individual and what is his or her relationship of rights on the one hand with the Member State and on the other hand with the European Community? This book examines the structure and content of European Community immigration law from the perspective of the individual most closely affected by that law.
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Edited by Elspeth Guild

This book marks thirty years of progress in realizing the free movement of persons in the European Union. Its origins are to be found in a conference held at King's College, London, organised by the Immigration Law Practitioners' Association and the Centre of European Law at King's College, London, with the sponsorship of the European Commission.
The book is divided into two sections: the first deals with the implementation of rights of nationals in the European Union to move, reside and exercise economic activities in other Member States. The second part looks at the development of European law regulating the movement, residence and economic activities of third country nationals within the territory of the Union. Each of the two parts, in its own way, analyzes the relation of the black letter law to the social consequences attendant on migration within the European Union. This is an invaluable analysis for practitioners and academics concerned with the development of a legal regime on migration in the European Union.
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Elspeth Guild

This book examines the result of the 23 June 2016 UK referendum on leaving the EU where 51.9% of the eligible voters who voted chose to leave. Politicians and media have stressed not only that leave means leave, but also that much of the British voting public was motivated to vote leave by issues of immigration and border control. Guild investigates how the issue of EU citizenship became transformed into a discussion about immigration through four themes: the negotiations between the UK and the EU before the referendum; the nature of and difference between British and EU citizenship; the issue of third country national family members and the fears incited by the referendum in light of the rejection of expertise.