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  • Author or Editor: Emilia Mataix Ferrándiz x
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In: Shipwrecks, Legal Landscapes and Mediterranean Paradigms
In: Shipwrecks, Legal Landscapes and Mediterranean Paradigms
In: Shipwrecks, Legal Landscapes and Mediterranean Paradigms
In: Shipwrecks, Legal Landscapes and Mediterranean Paradigms
In: Shipwrecks, Legal Landscapes and Mediterranean Paradigms
In: Shipwrecks, Legal Landscapes and Mediterranean Paradigms
In: Shipwrecks, Legal Landscapes and Mediterranean Paradigms
This book changes our understanding of the Roman conceptions about the sea by placing the focus on shipwrecks as events that act as bridges between the sea and the land. The study explores the different Roman legal definitions of these spaces, and how individuals of divergent legal statuses interacted within these areas. Its main purpose is to chart and analyse the Roman conception of the maritime landscape from the Late Republican until the Severan period. This book integrates maritime history and ethnography with the physical remains of past maritime systems, such as shipwrecks, ports, villages, fortifications, and documented legal rulings.

Abstract

Locatio conductio was one of the commonest contracts employed for shipping in which the risks of the trip were distributed among different actors. This constituted a consensual contract by means of which one of the parties (the locator) undertook, in exchange for a price, to rent to another person (the carrier) the use of something for a certain time, to carry out a certain task or to provide some service. This contract followed a unitary general legal scheme, which the parties adapted to their needs by agreement, something that would later have an impact on the preparation of the corresponding procedural defence. Unfortunately, no material example of this contract in Latin (there are some examples preserved in Greek papyri) has survived, and therefore, it needs to be reconstructed through legal and archaeological sources. This chapter focuses on the grain sample collected in CIL 4.9591, which provides information about freight contracts in commercial practice. On the one hand, this article will help to clarify some details of the epigraphic apparatus of this object, and on the other, it will serve to contrast what is established in the legal texts about the formation and features of lease and hire contracts and the practical sphere of commerce evidenced by this unique document.

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In: Law and Economic Performance in the Roman World