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As the forces of Catholic reform brought bishops back to their dioceses in sixteenth-century Italy, the act of preaching came to denote very different activities for mendicants preaching to the elite and for secular clerics first learning to preach to the uneducated. One preacher, however, the Augustinian Gabriele Fiamma, demonstrates that this gulf was not unbridgeable. Fiamma wrote both extremely ornate sermons and simple guides for secular clerics, even though he himself was not a bishop at the time. In addition, he continued to make the teaching of Scripture central to both kinds of preaching. Fiamma's decisions demonstrate that preachers, as conveyers of orthodox doctrine and religious education, not only remained central to Catholic identity in the post-Tridentine era but helped to reinforce that identity by embracing different Catholic audiences within their purview.

In: Nederlands Archief voor Kerkgeschiedenis / Dutch Review of Church History
In: Journal of Early Modern History
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Abstract

Jews in Rome were constrained to listen to weekly conversionary sermons – an event and legislation they resented. Such sermons began in the 1580s and continued through the 18th century. This essay will explore the variety of ways the Roman Jews resisted these sermons and will evaluate the effectiveness of their various forms of protest. These came in three general categories. The most common consisted of attempts to object to, or to improve the experience of having to attend sermons. This category included passive resistance during the sermons, attempts to change legislation, and objections to violent behaviour around sermon-going. The most dramatic were objections to content they considered unreasonable, demonstrated through petitionary treatises. Finally, we also have some evidence that sermons were routinely, even ritualistically refuted when they were delivered. Given the legal and religious constraints on the Jewish community of Rome, we will ask how much success could be expected from Jewish resistance, and how any success would be defined. In every case, we can document small or incremental victories, and consider whether this aggregation of resentment exerted a broader or long-term influence on the nature of conversionary preaching or sermons.

In: A Companion to Religious Minorities in Early Modern Rome
A Companion to Religious Minorities in Early Modern Rome investigates the lives and stories of the many groups and individuals in Rome, between 1500 and approximately 1750, who were not Roman (Latin) Catholic. It shows how early modern Catholic people and institutions in Rome were directly influenced by their interactions with other religious traditions. This collection reveals the significant impact of Protestants, Muslims, Jews, and Eastern Rite Christians; the influence of the many transient groups and individual travelers who passed through the city; the unique contributions of converts to Catholicism, who drew on the religion of their birth; and the importance of intermediaries, fluent in more than one culture and religion.

Contributors include: Olivia Adankpo-Labadie, Robert John Clines, Matthew Coneys Wainwright, Serena Di Nepi, Irene Fosi, Mayu Fujikawa, Sam Kennerley, Emily Michelson, James Nelson Novoa, Cesare Santus, Piet van Boxel, and Justine A. Walden.
In: A Companion to Religious Minorities in Early Modern Rome