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In: Relocating World Christianity
In: Relocating World Christianity
In: Ecumenism and Independency in World Christianity
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Abstract

World Christianity studies have often prioritised Christian pluriformity and attended to the under-represented or marginalised. Historians seeking indigenous voices, narratives and texts frequently find an overwhelming amount of European and North American missionary sources. Scholars have often been suspicious of such sources. This chapter advocates a fresh reading of missionary sources which acknowledges their variety of genre, audience and content and which triangulates their information with other sources. Using the Church Missionary Society (CMS) sources the chapter provides a sustained micro-historical example of a close and sophisticated reading to interpret the motivations of the missionaries and the relationships between missionaries and indigenous peoples. The chapter concludes that missionary sources show both unequal power relations and cultural exchange as they reveal the historical development of Christianity as connected global movements. In taking this approach, historians can see how far indigenous peoples were drawn to a cosmopolitan and universal missionary vision.

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In: World Christianity
In: Ecumenism and Independency in World Christianity
In: Critical Readings in the History of Christian Mission
In: Critical Readings in the History of Christian Mission
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Christianity and migration have greatly influenced society and culture of sub-Saharan Africa, yet their mutual impact is rarely studied. Through oral history research in north eastern Congo (DRC), this book studies the migration of Anglicans and the subsequent reconfiguring of their Christian identity. It engages with issues of religious contextualisation, revivalism and the rise of Pentecostalism. It examines shifting ethnic, national, gender and generational expressions, the influence of tradition, contemporanity, local needs and international networks to reveal mobile group identities developing through migration. Borrowing the metaphor of 'home' from those interviewed, the book suggests in what ways religious affiliation aids a process of belonging. The result is an original exploration of important themes in an often neglected region of Africa.
Author:
Christianity and migration have greatly influenced society and culture of sub-Saharan Africa, yet their mutual impact is rarely studied. Through oral history research in north eastern Congo (DRC), this book studies the migration of Anglicans and the subsequent reconfiguring of their Christian identity. It engages with issues of religious contextualisation, revivalism and the rise of Pentecostalism. It examines shifting ethnic, national, gender and generational expressions, the influence of tradition, contemporanity, local needs and international networks to reveal mobile group identities developing through migration. Borrowing the metaphor of 'home' from those interviewed, the book suggests in what ways religious affiliation aids a process of belonging. The result is an original exploration of important themes in an often neglected region of Africa.