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In: The Spirit Is Moving: New Pathways in Pneumatology
In: A Companion to the Reformation in Geneva
In: The Spirit Is Moving: New Pathways in Pneumatology
Historical and Hermeneutical Studies in John Calvin's 'sermons inédits', especially on Ezek. 36-48
Author: Erik A. de Boer
John Calvin's sermons on Ezekiel, held between 1552 and 1554 in the church 'la Madeleine' in Geneva and now studied for the first time, offer intriguing material on his exposition of prophetic visions. The manuscripts disclose the reformer's preaching on the book as a whole, including the visions on the restoration of Israel, Gog and Magog, and the great temple vision.
The first part of this study focuses on the history of patristic, medieval and 16th century exegesis of Ezekiel. The second part is a systematic theological analysis of the hermeneutical principles of Calvin's exposition of visionary revelation. Finally, the sermons on the visions of Ezek. 36-48, a unique specimen of literal historical exegesis with a christological perspective, are analysed.
Author: Erik A. de Boer

The name of Théodore de Bèze and the years of his life, 1519–1605, form the title of the stately volume in the well-known red cloth of Librairie Droz. Some 600 pages document the 2005 colloquium, held to commemorate Beza’s death four centuries ago. 35 scholars paid tribute to the successor of John Calvin in Geneva and give him the attention which he deserves in his own right. The book has four parts, in which are canvassed biographical and historical aspects, Beza’s theological, exegetical, and philological work, his contribution to literature, and finally the role of law

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In: Church History and Religious Culture
Author: Erik A. de Boer

The first volume of the annotated translation of Wolfgang Capito’s correspondence, covering the years 1507–1523, appeared in 2005. At the end of the same year Erika Rummel and Milton Kooistra, the editors of Capito’s letters, organized a workshop in Toronto for colleagues working on the correspondence of other reformers such as Bucer, Bullinger, Beza, and Erasmus. Reformation Sources documents the scholarly interaction at this conference.

The contributions are organized in three parts. Part I sketches the historical context. The contribution of Capito and other scholars to the printing business of Johann Froben in Basel takes up the first section

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In: Church History and Religious Culture
Author: Erik A. de Boer

After the terrible fate of the Jewish people in Auschwitz, and following the establishment of the State of Israel, Christian theology had to rethink the identity and position of the people of Israel—totally and fundamentally. In the wake of the same historical events another aspect emerged unexpectedly, which is the growth of that part of the Jews who called themselves Hebrew Christians, Jewish Christians, or Messianic Jews (further: MJ). The latter name is favoured nowadays. When speaking of the historical movement of the first centuries the term Judaeo-Christians is mostly used.

The emergence of the contours of a Messianic Jewish

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In: Journal of Reformed Theology
Author: Erik A. de Boer

Abstract

In their critique of the hierarchy in the Roman Catholic Church most reformers in the sixteenth century did not argue for retaining the office of bishop. In the English Reformation, led by the king, the bishopric was reformed, and in Hungary, too, the office of bishop survived. Did reformers like John Calvin fundamentally reject this office, or did they primarily attack its abuse? Investigation of the early work of Calvin shows a focus on the meaning of the biblical term ‘overseer’ and on preaching as the primary function of the episcopacy. While the title of bishop is reserved for the one head of the church, the office of the preacher is brought to a higher level. As moderator of the Company of Pastors in Geneva, Calvin would have a standing in the city comparable to the ousted bishop.

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In: Journal of Reformed Theology
Culture and Confessional Identity in Francophone Reformed Communities
The eleven essays in Emancipating Calvin: Culture and Confessional Identity in Francophone Reformed Communities demonstrate the vitality and variety of early modern Francophone Reformed communities by examining the ways that local contexts shaped the reception and implementation of reforming ideas emanating especially from John Calvin and the Reformed church of Geneva. The articles address three main themes important for understanding the development of Reformed communities: the roles of consistories in Reformed churches and communities, the development of various Reformed cultures, and the ways in which ritual and worship embodied the theology and cultural foundations of Francophone Reformed churches. This Festschrift honors the pioneering work of Raymond Mentzer and reflects his influence in modern Francophone Reformed studies.
In: Emancipating Calvin