Author: Erika Rummel
Although polemics dominated Erasmus' literary output in the last two decades of his life, the controversies remain among the most neglected pieces in the corpus of his writings. On a different level, they add a dimension often missing in portraits of Erasmus. Usually depicted as the urbane and witty humanist who enjoyed great popularity and prestige, he appears in the works of his critics as a contentious and duplicitous "theologizer" who inspired disdain and loathing.
Author: Erika Rummel
Throughout the Middle Ages dialectical disputation was the prevailing method of scholarly inquiry. In the fifteenth century, however, humanists challenged the scholastic method, proposing instead historical and philological approaches. This volume focuses on the polemic over the right approach to biblical studies. It describes manifestations of the controversy, ranging from its beginnings in quattrocento Italy to Germany, Spain, France, the Netherlands, and scholars associated with the papal court in the sixteenth century. Erasmus, the most prominent biblical humanist of his day, served as a lightning rod for many of the controversies discussed here and has also received much attention from modern scholars. The chapters offered here seek to lend a voice also to Erasmus’ critics and to right the balance in a historical narrative that has traditionally favoured the humanists. Contributors are John Monfasani, Daniel Menager, Carlos del Valle Rodríguez, Alejandro Coroleu, Charles Fantazzi, Guy Bedouelle, James Farge, Cecilia Asso, Marcel Gielis, Paolo Sartori, Paul F. Grendler, Nelson H. Minnich, Ronald K. Delph
In: Erasmus Studies
In: Erasmus Studies