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In: 'Holocaust'-Fiktion

In this chapter, Ernst van Alphen explores the possibility and productiveness of the idea that affects have legible forms. The author goes beyond the idea that affect is an energetic intensity effecting a reaction in a reader or viewer. Legible forms will also be distinguished from legible signs. Although signs have form, forms do not always result in conventional signs. Van Alphen close-reads the forms of affect in Andrew Wyeth’s iconic 1948 painting Christina’s World. The concluding consideration will be the question of how the formal affective reading of this painting relates to close readings in terms of signification.

In: Legibility in the Age of Signs and Machines

In this chapter, Ernst van Alphen explores the possibility and productiveness of the idea that affects have legible forms. The author goes beyond the idea that affect is an energetic intensity effecting a reaction in a reader or viewer. Legible forms will also be distinguished from legible signs. Although signs have form, forms do not always result in conventional signs. Van Alphen close-reads the forms of affect in Andrew Wyeth’s iconic 1948 painting Christina’s World. The concluding consideration will be the question of how the formal affective reading of this painting relates to close readings in terms of signification.

In: Legibility in the Age of Signs and Machines

Abstract

Inspired by Eugenie Brinkema’s book The Forms of the Affects, this chapter explores the possibility and productiveness of the idea that formal elements of texts and images trigger or activate affects, and that cultural analysts can read these “forms of affects.” Although affect can be, and will be, considered as intensity, attention will be shifted to what it is that triggers these intensities. It is the work of Francis Bacon that will be read for the affective charge it releases. In the reading of Bacon’s paintings that follow here, the ‘work of affect’ in Bacon will be made explicit by engaging a conversation between Deleuze on Bacon and my own earlier work on Bacon. In this conversation conventional significations will be negotiated with unconventional forms, encountered as affects that shock to thought.

In: How to Do Things with Affects

Abstract

Inspired by Eugenie Brinkema’s book The Forms of the Affects, this chapter explores the possibility and productiveness of the idea that formal elements of texts and images trigger or activate affects, and that cultural analysts can read these “forms of affects.” Although affect can be, and will be, considered as intensity, attention will be shifted to what it is that triggers these intensities. It is the work of Francis Bacon that will be read for the affective charge it releases. In the reading of Bacon’s paintings that follow here, the ‘work of affect’ in Bacon will be made explicit by engaging a conversation between Deleuze on Bacon and my own earlier work on Bacon. In this conversation conventional significations will be negotiated with unconventional forms, encountered as affects that shock to thought.

In: How to Do Things with Affects
Thamyris seeks to initiate alternative forms of criticism by analysing the ways in which cultural and theoretical discourses intervene in the contemporary world. This criticism should pursue a re-politicizing and remobilizing of theoretical perspectives and cultural practices, preferably through case studies. Thamyris hopes to contribute to the productive interaction between art, activism, and theory. We understand cultural practices to include those of literary, visual, digital, and performance arts, but also social practices related to gender, sexuality, and ethnicity. In short, Thamyris aims at exploring the ways in which varying cultural practices, separately or in interaction, can be effective as agents of social and cultural change.

Abstract

In light of the video installation Facing Forward by the artist Fiona Tan, this article discusses the connection between place, history and migrancy. It explores how migrant identity, seen as an imagined, identificatory relation to an originating place (the so-called homeland) is at the same time predicated on time, and hence, on history. The act of imagining homeland identity is always framed by the historical dimensions of that place and of the migration that started from there, but it is also inflected by those acts of imagining that produce the cultural identity in the present. Tan’s Facing Forward is discussed as a theoretical object, which contends that the act of imagining homeland identity is radically framed by the historical dimensions of the place where the imagining act takes place.

In: Mobilizing Place, Placing Mobility

Abstract

In light of the video installation Facing Forward by the artist Fiona Tan, this article discusses the connection between place, history and migrancy. It explores how migrant identity, seen as an imagined, identificatory relation to an originating place (the so-called homeland) is at the same time predicated on time, and hence, on history. The act of imagining homeland identity is always framed by the historical dimensions of that place and of the migration that started from there, but it is also inflected by those acts of imagining that produce the cultural identity in the present. Tan’s Facing Forward is discussed as a theoretical object, which contends that the act of imagining homeland identity is radically framed by the historical dimensions of the place where the imagining act takes place.

In: Mobilizing Place, Placing Mobility

Abstract

Africa as Textual Play

Walter Abish’s novel Alphabetical Africa of 1974 is a linguistic tour de force, as, one by one, the author adds the letters of the alphabet to the book, and then subtracts them again. The setting for this textual play is Africa. In terms of the historical and theoretical discrepancy between the interest in postmodernism and neo-avant-garde in the seventies and that in the postcolonial and multicultural condition of forty years later, the following questions emerge. Is this novel just using Africa as a playground for the imagination in the context of a reflection on the conditions of textuality and the arbitrariness of the signifier? Or is this literary representation of Africa important in a paradoxical real sense, so that it can also have implications for debates on postcolonial issues?

In: Africa and Its Significant Others
Thamyris seeks to initiate alternative forms of criticism by analysing the ways in which cultural and theoretical discourses intervene in the contemporary world. This criticism should pursue a re-politicizing and remobilizing of theoretical perspectives and cultural practices, preferably through case studies. Thamyris hopes to contribute to the productive interaction between art, activism, and theory. We understand cultural practices to include those of literary, visual, digital, and performance arts, but also social practices related to gender, sexuality, and ethnicity. In short, Thamyris aims at exploring the ways in which varying cultural practices, separately or in interaction, can be effective as agents of social and cultural change.