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The people of Sogdiana were the main caravan merchants of Central Asia from the 5th to the 8th century.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online

personal soldier-retainer of the nobility in pre-Islamic Central Asia.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online

(Hsiung-nu), the great nomadic empire to the north of China in the 2nd and 1st centuries BCE, which extended to Iranian-speaking Central Asia and perhaps gave rise to the Huns of the Central Asian Iranian sources.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online

a title that entered Persian and was used by medieval Muslim historians in reference to various rulers.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online
The Sogdian Traders were the main go-between of Central Asia from the fifth to the eighth century. From their towns of Samarkand, Bukhara, or Tashkent, their diaspora is attested by texts, inscriptions or archaeology in all the major countries of Asia (India, China, Iran, Turkish Steppe, but also Byzantium). This survey for the first time brings together all the data on their trade, from the beginning, a small-scale trade in the first century BC up to its end in the tenth century. It should interest all the specialists of Ancient and Medieval Asia (including specialists of Sinology, Islamic Studies, Iranology, Turkology and Indology) but also specialists of Medieval Economic History.

Abstract

This article presents recent archaeological discoveries on the Buddhist monasteries, the irrigation system and defence systems of the oasis of Balkh, intending to explore the depth of the gap between these central features of the oasis landscape and the transmitted early Islamic texts describing the site. The Fażāʾil-i Balḫ and the Ḥudūd al-ʿĀlam do provide us with some data but the archaeology allows a detailed demonstration of how many parts of the pre-Islamic past were quickly forgotten or reinterpreted in the following centuries.

In: Cities of Medieval Iran

Abstract

This short note proposes that a hapax legomenon in a fifth century list of enemies of Khotan might give a half a millennium antecedent to the name of the Mongols, as an alternative, and older, name of the Mongol-speaking Rouran.

In: International Journal of Eurasian Linguistics

Abstract

This article presents recent archaeological discoveries on the Buddhist monasteries, the irrigation system and defence systems of the oasis of Balkh, intending to explore the depth of the gap between these central features of the oasis landscape and the transmitted early Islamic texts describing the site. The Fażāʾil-i Balḫ and the Ḥudūd al-ʿĀlam do provide us with some data but the archaeology allows a detailed demonstration of how many parts of the pre-Islamic past were quickly forgotten or reinterpreted in the following centuries.

In: Eurasian Studies