Author: Eva F Nisa

Indonesia is known in Malaysia as the main supplier of migrant workers. Under the Immigration Act and based on their working contracts, Indonesian migrant workers cannot marry in Malaysia during their contract period. Hence, unregistered marriages are common among Indonesian migrant workers in Malaysia. This article investigates both the perspectives of migrant workers who have entered into non-state-registered marriages and the strategies of Indonesian diplomatic representatives in dealing with unregistered marriages of Indonesian migrant workers. Observing a growing trend of both unregistered marriages and of the recognition of such marriages by state agents, this article emphasizes the importance of taking into account the social, political, and religious context to understand how the law operates and how these workers navigate the constraints they are facing.

In: Sociology of Islam
Author: Eva F. Nisa

Abstract

The religious transformation experienced by cadari(face-veiled women) in Indonesia belonging to two revivalist movements, Tablighi Jamāʿat and Salafism, has propelled them to change their habitus. The nature of their new pious habitus has shaped the life of these women including their marital life. The embodiment of this pious habitus can be seen in practices related to marriage ranging from choice of marriage partner, interactions with marriage partner, new marriage practices (arranged marriage, early marriage and mass marriage) and termination of marriage. All of these can be regarded as their efforts to construct a pious self and an ideal Islamic family, keluarga sakinah(harmonious family). Since religious doctrines are very important in the life of the cadari, religious homogamy is a crucial aspect in their decision to get married or divorced. While there are some studies on the importance of religious homogamy in sustaining marital satisfaction and stability, the experiences of women in such marriages has often been neglected. This article focuses on the importance of religious homogamy by listening to the experiences of cadariwomen.

In: Asian Journal of Social Science
Authors: Monika Arnez and Eva F. Nisa

Based on ethnographic fieldwork and literary analysis, this article analyses the Forum Lingkar Pena (FLP), the largest transnational writers’ collective for Muslim readers, writers, and publishers in Indonesia. In the light of the different FLP ‘subcultures’ embedded within the local framework of the respective branches, we examine moral solidarity as a unifying element of the forum’s divisions. We presume that the FLP is characterized by moral solidarity, which is to be understood here to mean responding to the moral needs of other people by means of sympathetic understanding. This essay depicts the ways in which moral solidarity functions in the FLP, and how it opens up new perspectives for people who have a less privileged position in society. Moreover, it demonstrates that to better understand this writers’ collective and the wider FLP family, the concept of moral solidarity needs to be complemented by a consideration of individual moral agency.

Author: Eva F. Nisa

Abstract

Social media have become part of the private and public lifestyles of youth globally. Drawing on both online and offline research in Indonesia, this article focuses on the use of Instagram by Indonesian Muslim youth. It analyzes how religious messages uploaded on Instagram through posts and captions have a significant effect on the way in which Indonesian Muslim youth understand their religion and accentuate their (pious) identities and life goals. This article argues that Instagram has recently become the ultimate platform for Indonesian female Muslim youth to educate each other in becoming virtuous Muslims. The creativity and zeal of the creators of Instagram daʿwa (proselytization), and their firm belief that ‘a picture is worth a thousand words’, has positioned them as social media influencers, which in turn has enabled them to conduct both soft daʿwa and lucrative daʿwa through business.

In: Asiascape: Digital Asia