Volume Editor: Fabio Dovigo
The wave of migrants arriving in Europe fleeing from war or hard living conditions represents both a challenge and a great educational opportunity for the European school systems. Currently, research and good practice in this field have been mainly developed within the boundaries of national educational politics and policies, addressing distinct populations. This fragmentation has stood in the way of a systematic analysis of the question at the European level, which is a necessary condition for the advancement of successful educational interventions. The book aims to offer substantive insights for researchers, policy makers, and teachers concerned with the effective inclusion of refugees within education by collecting and comparing the growing body of knowledge that is emerging from eight European countries.

Contributors are: Oula Abu-Amsha, Miki Aristorenas, Tatjana Atanasoska, Benjamin Brass, Henrik Bruns, Heike de Boer, Sanja Grbić, Hermina Gunnþórsdóttir, Laure Kloetzer, Tünde Kovacs Cerović, Louise Pagden, Michelle Proyer, Wayne Veck, Dragan Vesić, and Julie Wharton.
In: Challenges and Opportunities in Education for Refugees in Europe
In: Challenges and Opportunities in Education for Refugees in Europe
In: Challenges and Opportunities in Education for Refugees in Europe
In: Special Educational Needs and Inclusive Practices
In: Special Educational Needs and Inclusive Practices
In: Special Educational Needs and Inclusive Practices
Volume Editor: Fabio Dovigo
Today, school is becoming a rapidly changing learning environment. Thinking about students as a homogeneous population is no longer allowed, as diversity—in terms of culture, language, gender, family organisation, learning styles and so on—has emerged as a key challenge for education today.
The debate on Special Educational Needs largely reflects this challenge, as working in school implies careful reconsideration of what we mean by “normal” and “special”. Current educational intervention is generally based on a deficit and “within-child” model of facing SEN, whereas very little attention is given to the role of learning environments. The focus is on the child more than on the whole class, and on cognition and technical provisions more than on affective, sociocultural and community dimensions of learning. Conversely, regarding students and their needs as “hidden voices” allows us to adopt a transformative approach which sees diversity as a stimulus for the development of educational practices that might benefit all children and help school to become an inclusive and “moving” organisation.
The aim of the book is twofold: on the one hand, it offers a systematic overview of the inclusive education state-of-the-art in six countries (Germany, Italy, Norway, Sweden, UK, and USA) based on the contributions by well-known scholars such as Christy Ashby, Barbara Brokamp, Fabio Dovigo, Kari Nes, Mara Westling Allodi, Tony Booth, and Beth Ferri; on the other hand, the book analyses five cases of good practices of inclusion related to different subjects and school levels.
Author: Fabio Dovigo

Abstract

In the last twenty years, there has been growing interest internationally in the increase and diversification of the population of students attending Higher Education. Higher Education is one of the most important factors that can foster social mobility, by reducing disadvantages and poverty across generations and having a broad impact across all of society. Widening participation in Higher Education, usually referred to as the “social dimension” of the Bologna Process in Europe, aims to promote equality of opportunities concerning: access, retention, participation and successful completion of studies; living and studying conditions; student guidance and counselling; financial support; equal opportunities in mobility; and supporting student participation in Higher Education governance. These objectives are in line with the idea that the diversity of the population should be reflected by the student body, and that students’ participation in Higher Education should not be limited by their different backgrounds. The chapter will offer an analysis of the way the social dimension has been developed in the European context over the years, as well as an overview of the results achieved and the next challenges to be faced by the Higher Education institutions.

In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe
Author: Fabio Dovigo

Abstract

The positive advantages of diversity in the Higher Education environment have been largely documented by research. Nevertheless, face to the apparent benefits of diversity, current attempts to widen and reinforce HE participation still deal with a number of challenges. Even though European governments repeatedly committed to the goals of increasing graduation rates and fostering diversity in HE, the lack of financial support, combined with unfavourable demographic patterns, prevents them to reach such ambitious objectives. Consequently, universities still tend to be open to students that are likely to succeed from the outset more than those that are affected by economic, social or cultural drawbacks. To counter this trend, good practices concerning favouring the access, retention and success of underprivileged students to Higher Education have been brought about in many European countries. The chapter will provide an examination of the socioeconomic, organisational and educational factors that influence the development of good practices in Italy, as well as an evaluation of the advantages and limitations of the good practices approach applied to Higher Education.

In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe