Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for

  • Author or Editor: Ferdinand J.M. Feldbrugge x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
The political, economic, and social reforms resulting from Gorbachev's perestroika have become more radical and comprehensive throughout the years.
Increasingly, in their implementation, a central role has been accorded to law. The construction of a viable democratic system, the establishment of an economy in which market factors are decisive, the readmittance of a pluralistic civil society, all of them presuppose, in the eyes of the present Soviet leadership, the creation of a reliable legal foundation.
Legislative activity in the Soviet Union during the past few years has therefore been hectic. At the same time, while law was being used as an instrument of change, the character of Soviet law itself was deeply affected. From being the obedient servant of a totalitarian master, law is becoming the core element of a new order in which its supremacy is accepted as the starting point for redesigning all the major sectors of social life.
In this volume a number of leader Western experts consider the practical effect of this emancipatory process on the most important branches of Soviet law and investigate its philosophical dimensions.
This special issue of the REVIEW OF CENTRAL AND EAST EUROPEAN LAW compiles the material published under the head `Russian Federation Legislative Survey' in the six 1993 issues of the journal. It covers Russian legislation from the date of the Declaration of the State of Sovereignty of the RSFSR (12 June 1990) until the end of 1992. The principal watershed in this period was the disappearance of the USSR. This event had far-reaching consequences for Russian law, because of the two-tier character of law in the former Soviet Union: USSR law at the top, and underneath the subordinate legal systems of the individual union republics, including the RSFSR. These consequences can still be felt in many areas, and it will take considerable time and major efforts to replace all USSR law by new Russian enactments.
The Institute of East European Law and Russian Studies intends to bring this survey up to date as soon as possible. This is of course desirable for the practitioner, as well as for the academic user. It is felt, however, that it was imperative to build on a solid foundation, even if it meant some delay in the beginning. As new official sources of legislation emerge, as some already have in 1993, they will be included in the issues of the REVIEW OF CENTRAL AND EAST EUROPEAN LAW. The present survey is a reprint of the fourth issue of the REVIEW OF CENTRAL AND EAST EUROPEAN LAW (1994) and is available gratis to subscribers.
The End of the Soviet System and the Role of Law
This is the first treatise on Russia's new legal system, as it emerged from the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The first part of the book analyses in detail the political and economic origins of perestroika, indispensable for understanding the basic parameters of the evolution of Russian law. In the following chapters all major legal subjects are discussed against the background of their Soviet past and as the result of the radical changes in the political, social and economic make-up of the country. The appendices include the texts of the U.S.S.R. and Russian Constitutions, the Agreement of Minsk, The Russian Federation Treaty, bibliographical sources, and extensive indices of Soviet and Russian legislation.
The book has been written for legal practitioners, comparative lawyers, and students of Russian law, but will also be of interest to a wider audience of political scientists, journalists, etc.
This is the first treatise on Russia's new legal system, as it emerged from the dissolution of the Soviet Union. The first part of the book analyses in detail the political and economic origins of perestroika, indispensable for understanding the basic parameters of the evolution of Russian law. In the following chapters all major legal subjects are discussed against the background of their Soviet past and as the result of the radical changes in the political, social and economic make-up of the country. The appendices include the texts of the U.S.S.R. and Russian Constitutions, the Agreement of Minsk, The Russian Federation Treaty, bibliographical sources, and extensive indices of Soviet and Russian legislation.
The book has been written for legal practitioners, comparative lawyers, and students of Russian law, but will also be of interest to a wider audience of political scientists, journalists, etc.
During the last two decades Russia has gone through a process of radical political and socio-economic transformation. The legal system has reflected the various stages of this process and has also been a major agent in moving it forward. The country is at a crossroads now. External observers are sharply divided in evaluating the performance and intentions of the Russian leadership. Russia itself is involved in finding out where it stands. What sort of federation does it want to be? How will it define its relationship to Europe and to its former sister republics? The answers to such questions fundamentally affect the future shape of Russian law. At the same time, existing legal structures may predetermine the course Russia will take.