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  • Author or Editor: Fiona Westbrook x
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Abstract

This article offers a means of analysing social networking, visual dialogues of emojis, gif s (images in the Graphics Interchange Format), embedded images, videos, and url s (Uniform Resource Locators). Doing so addresses these often overlooked and undervalued forms of visual communication, suggesting a unique means of gaining insights into their use within online interactions. Utilising a Bakhtinian methodology, the author extracts excerpts from her research, situated within Facebook, to demonstrate a Bakhtinian genre analysis, a framework that the author contends is adaptable to multiple social networking spaces. Highlighting emojis, gif s, embedded images, videos, and url s as integral components of online communication, an emphasis is placed on how the text dances with the visual, presenting a nuanced framework for such an analysis. Consequently, an argument is developed for the significance of visual dialogues in contemporary online spaces, and the need for researchers to better understand these dynamic forms of communication, offered through Bakhtinian dialogism.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

The role of play in early childhood settings has become a global issue due to coordinated policy trends that privilege early learning, academic foci and formalised assessments amid a broader economic and investment agenda. This paper undertakes a critical discourse analysis of the Australian and New Zealand national early childhood curricula frameworks in order to examine the treatment of play and learning as they relate to one another. The analysis revealed that curriculum documents from both Australia and New Zealand drew on lifelong learning ideological frames to present a view of play as an activator of learning, where learning is interpreted as observable and recognisable academic processes. It was found that the agency attributed to the child in play and learning processes was central to how the role of the adult was interpreted, with implications for the play opportunities that children may encounter.

Free access
In: Beijing International Review of Education

Abstract

Early transitions are on the rise across global and national contexts. However, resources informing teachers and families about best practices concerning infants, especially infant transitions from home to early childhood settings, are almost non-existent. In this article, the authors share the outcomes of an experiment that translated research from an International Study of the Social and Emotional Experiences of Early Transitions (isseet) project into a range of visual resources for this audience. They created a suite of video, infographic and meme visual resources that outlined ‘what works’ for quality early transitions and sought end-user feedback around their utility. While the feedback was positive overall concerning infographics and videos, end-users expressed strong negative responses to the use of memes. In the article that follows, the authors explore why it might be so. They draw on the Bakhtinian concept of genre. With its form, content and strategic orientation, they translate and interpret the meaning ascribed to the memes. They argue that the complex humour and cultural memory that sit behind memes grants them unique translation status. Reflecting on the responses, the authors consider pathways for memes as impactful research translation for end-users – in this case, early years teachers.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

covid-19 is an omnipresent feature of 2020, both globally and within Australia. For university students, a consequence of this has been the shift from on-campus to online delivery. Exploring these visual realities for lecturers and students, this article engages in Bakhtinian dialogism; a dialogic interaction that is born between peoples searching for meaning (). To do so, the authors engaged with and responded to students’ survey data whom they lecture and coordinate. Although the survey had limited responses, it enabled the authors to dialogue about received knowledge (istina) from students and contemplate this in relation to the authors’ own perspectives and experiences (pravda). Through this engagement, they suggest the importance of visually imbued emotive connectivity and dialogic relational care within web-conferencing, as well as didactic lecturing as valid forms of visual engagement.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy