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Human Rights Protection

Methods and Effectiveness

Edited by Frances Butler

All institutions have human rights responsibilities. Some have been set up with this function and others have had human rights principles thrust upon them. This book explores how different institutions, from state entities, national human rights commissions and the judiciary, to the United Nations agencies and international courts, have engaged in human rights protection. There is analysis of their evolution in this role and the methods that they use.

Northern Ireland and Bosnia & Herzegovina are illustrative of what can happen to human rights when societies are in conflict. Other chapters consider the development of international criminal law, the trouble with treaties, and the increasing pressure on corporations to demonstrate social responsibility. There is plenty of evidence that human rights protection is as important as ever and this book looks at what is required to achieve this effectively.

The British Institute of Human Rights aims to further the protection of human rights through education and research. It is a charity based at King's College London.
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Edited by Frances Butler

The British Institute of Human Rights has long argued the case for incorporation of the European Convention of Human Rights into UK law. But how does the Human Rights Act achieve this and what changes will it make to the legal, social and political landscape?
This book analyses the historical and political imperatives behind the new human rights legislation and provides a detailed examination of the interpretative record of the judiciary so far. The mechanics of implementation of the Act are explored in detail: who has rights, who has responsibilities and how these are enforced. There is in-depth analysis of three specific areas affected by the new legislation: criminal justice, equality and employment, and disputes within families.
In each case, the potential in the Human Rights Act, assisted by Strasbourg decisions and other international jurisprudence, is tested against the prevailing position under domestic law. Finally, there is reflection on the UK's other international human rights commitments and scrutiny of governmental compliance with them. With contributions from leading human rights lawyers, jurists and thinkers, this book deconstructs the Human Rights Act and explains its meaning and significance.