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Abstract

In the eighteenth-century German context, historia literaria (‘history of learning’) and encyclopaedias were the most prominent genres of general instruction in any subject of academic relevance. Since they formed a guide to young academics through the confusing world of academic erudition, from a historical point of view it is worthwhile to analyse which theoretical elements, authors and conceptual developments in the law of nations students and a non-specialized public got to know when they were introduced to the subject through textbooks and courses in these genres. The chapter deals with the following questions: 1. To which discipline did the law of nations belong according to the authors of the relevant compendia? 2. How did they define the law of nations? 3. Did they make a distinction between natural law and the law of nations, and how did they conceive the relationship between the natural law and the law of nations? 4. Which authors and which books did they principally present in the discussion of the law of nations? The analysis accounts for the development of the law of nations on the one hand, and for the way in which these developments were reflected in textbooks on the other.

Open Access
In: The Law of Nations and Natural Law 1625–1800
In: Denken durch die Dinge
In: Denken durch die Dinge
In: Denken durch die Dinge
In: Denken durch die Dinge
In: Denken durch die Dinge
In: Denken durch die Dinge