Author: Frank Mehring

This article critically addresses the multivalent function of American art exhibitions in the period of de-Nazification and re-democratization. What kind of cultural and political parameters shaped the perception of American Art in Germany during the early post-war years? I investigate intercultural confrontations surrounding the project of advancing American art and the critical response of German audiences by first looking at the exhibition Advancing American Art from 1947. I then analyze the role of the transatlantic cultural mediator Hilla von Rebay to understand developments in the German perspective on American art. The German-born artist von Rebay emigrated in 1927 to the United States and organized the German tour of Zeitgenössische Kunst und Kunstpflege in U.S.A. (Contemporary Art and the Promotion of Arts in the U.S.A.) authorized by the Office of Military Government, United States (OMGUS) in 1948. The project of ‘advancing American art’ resembles a struggle with many setbacks due to lack of official support and finding a larger public in the early years after World War II.

In: International Journal for History, Culture and Modernity
In: Politics and Cultures of Liberation
Media, Memory, and Projections of Democracy
Politics and Cultures of Liberation: Media, Memory, and Projections of Democracy focuses on mapping, analyzing, and evaluating memories, rituals, and artistic responses to the theme of “liberation.” How is the national framed within a dynamic system of intercultural contact zones highlighting often competing agendas of remembrance? How does the production, (re)mediation, and framing of narratives within different social, territorial, and political environments determine the cultural memory of liberation? The articles compiled in this volume seek to provide new interdisciplinary and intercultural perspectives on the politics and cultures of liberation by examining commemorative practices, artistic responses, and audio-visual media that lend themselves for transnational exploration. They offer a wide range of diverse intercultural perspectives on media, memory, liberation, (self)Americanization, and conceptualizations of democracy from the war years, through the Cold War era to the 21st century.

This essay introduces the special issue on the forging of the ‘American Century’, which brings together American and European scholars to revisit the time between the entrance of the U.S. into World War II and the era of the European Reconstruction. Exploring the multivalent agents and forces involved in forging the American Century, the various articles bring into play national and transnational trajectories that inform politics, media and popular culture. Rather than adhering to a single theoretical approach, the articles offer a wide range of intercultural, theoretical and methodological perspectives.

In: International Journal for History, Culture and Modernity
In: Politics and Cultures of Liberation
In: Politics and Cultures of Liberation
In: Politics and Cultures of Liberation
In: Politics and Cultures of Liberation
In: Politics and Cultures of Liberation