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Author: Franz Winter

Abstract

Herman Wirth Roeper Bosch (1885-1981) was an important theoretician of the racist theory of Nazi-Germany. This article deals with his major publication, ,,Der Aufgang der Menschheit“ (published 1928), wherein he provides a theory on the origins of the socalled ,,atlantidian“ race. One of the foundations is the so called ,,primordial monotheism“ (Urmonotheismustheorie), which was quite popular in the first half of the 20th century. This article provides an attempt to analyse the main features of his approach with reference to the scholarly discussion in religious studies and ethnology of his time.

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In: Zeitschrift für Religions- und Geistesgeschichte
In: Handbook of East Asian New Religious Movements
In: Handbook of East Asian New Religious Movements
Author: Franz Winter

Abstract

The Japanese new religious movement Kōfuku no kagaku (literally, ‘the science of happiness;’ presenting itself internationally as Happy Science), founded in 1986, is in many ways a typical example of the most recent phase of new religions in Japan. Amongst its many features the interest in several ufological topics is a major aspect, particularly when it comes to their view of the history of humankind with the ancient astronauts theory as the most prominent element. The contribution is an attempt to place these teachings within the frame of the history and development of the movement, but also in the wider context of the recent history of Japanese religions.

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In: Handbook of UFO Religions
In: Handbook of Hinduism in Europe (2 vols)
In: Handbook of Hinduism in Europe (2 vols)
Author: Franz Winter

Abstract

The Upaniṣads are commonly regarded as the ultimate summary of the Indian Weltanschauung. This high esteem is the result of a rather convoluted history of reception in different cultural environments. The article draws on their first interpretations in the Muslim and the European horizon, which are closely interconnected by a fascinating story of translation, namely the Sirr-i akbar of the Mughal prince Dārā Shukūh (1615–1659) and the Oupnek’hat by A. H. Anquetil-Duperron (1731–1805). As will be argued, both mediators have a comparable attitude towards the Indian corpus, and their search for the “one” (= God = Allah) is deeply rooted in perceptions of a single “sacred book” containing the ultimate expression of the truth, which is the object of a “hidden” transmission undetected so far. The goal of this article is to present the common features of their approaches based on a detailed historical examination of the available material.

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In: Numen