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Fraser

Abstract

With the help of the integrated study of time, the paper traces the evolution of causation and time. Then, based on what has been learned and assisted by a critique of the idea that our experience of passage is rooted in cosmic entropy increase, it suggests that the human experience of time derives from the constitutive conflicts of matter, life, and personal and collective human identities. It shows that all of these conflicts derive from the evolutionary constraints upon the primeval chaos.

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Fraser

Abstract

Although globalization promotes homogenization, what we are observing is an intricate and bewildering, worldwide chaos of plans and values. Could some part of history be identified as a prologue to our epoch and, for that reason, used as a guide in our search for ways and means of dealing with that storm of values and plans? I suggest that there can be no prologue to the tensions and problems of globalizing humanity because no prior epoch possessed the promises and threats of our epoch, in the dimensions and intensities we observe them. This essay suggests that the history of humankind as a single social entity—with its unique problems is just beginning. A global community of instant everywhere is only now being constructed. This essay visits that construction process. It recommends that the cries of globalization be explored with the help of the integrated, interdisciplinary study of time for the purpose of helping us appreciate the nature and details of the global changes.

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Fraser

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Fraser

Abstract

With the help of the hierarchical theory of time, this essay (i) attempts to locate the sources of desires which, in their qualities, are peculiar to humans, (ii) explores the nature of freedoms available for the satisfaction of those desires and (iii) identifies the dynamics of conflicts that arise from possessing unbounded imagination in a bounded universe.

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Fraser

Abstract

The experience of time's passage is intimately familiar, the idea of time is strangely elusive. Mature, healthy humans find it is easy to act consistently with the notions of tomorrow, yesterday and today.Yet, explaining what is meant by future, past, and present, without assuming prior familiarity with time, seems impossible. The asymmetry between the obviousness of the experience of time, and the unobviousness of the idea of time, has been a source of perplexity to reflective thought for at least fourteen centuries. This essay sees the sources of that asymmetry in the evolutionary structuring of the cognitive capacities of the human brain. It draws attention to certain conflicts rooted in the differences between those cognitive capacities- copresent in the mind- and notes the importance of the humanities in the management of the conflicts.

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Fraser

Abstract

The structure of mathematics, as revealed by the exploration of axiomatic systems, bears striking similarities to the structure of nature, as revealed by the hierarchical theory of time. It is assumed that this isomorphism is not accidental but reflects the evolutionary development of the human capacity of handling numbers. This assumption permits a conjecture. Namely, if mathematics is found to possess certain systematic uncertainties, than nature must also possess corresponding qualities which may be identified. The paper proposes that the theme of the conference, "time and uncertainty," be understood in this broad context. I would like to demonstrate the existence of certain striking similarities between the structure and properties of mathematics on the one hand and, on the other hand, the structures and processes of nature at large, as revealed by the hierarchical theory of time. Then, using these correspondences, I propose a framework that promises to provide a unified perspective for the rich program we have ahead.

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Fraser

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Fraser

Abstract

Space-time is a four-dimensional abstract space, an analytical tool used in carrying out the program of relativity theory. That program requires that the laws of physics be stated in mathematical forms that remain unaffected - that are not changed - by the motion of the coordinate system in which they are applied. The nature of time, as understood in the context of space-time, differs from the common idea of time in that it makes no provisions for a "now" - for a present - and for the passing of time. Ideas about a present instant and about the passage of time have to be imported into physics from domains of knowledge outside physics. With the help of evolutionary epistemology based on evolutionary ontology, this paper locates the time of relativity's space-time in the integrated, interdisciplinary study of time.