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The reformed theologian Max L. Stackhouse develops a differentiated analysis and interpretation of globalization as part of his public theology. He consistently refers to Kuyper's concept of common grace and transfers Kuyper's teaching into a hermeneutical approach to sociological analysis. First, the paper sketches Stackhouse's understanding of globalization as a theological process, then analyses the influences of Kuyper's theology of grace and finally shows the theological roots of Stackhouse's doctrine of grace and methodological problems associated with it. It closes with remarks on the opportunities and limits of Stackhouse's approach to the theological interpretation of globalization.

In: Philosophia Reformata

Abstract

The reformed theologian Max L. Stackhouse develops a differentiated analysis and interpretation of globalization as part of his public theology. He consistently refers to Kuyper’s concept of common grace and transfers Kuyper’s teaching into a hermeneutical approach to sociological analysis. First, the paper sketches Stackhouse’s understanding of globalization as a theological process, then analyses the influences of Kuyper’s theology of grace and finally shows the theological roots of Stackhouse’s doctrine of grace and methodological problems associated with it. It closes with remarks on the opportunities and limits of Stackhouse’s approach to the theological interpretation of globalization.

In: Christian Faith, Philosophy & International Relations

Abstract

This article examines how public theologians aim to bring their theology into the practice of the church. In the first part it analyses the references to the church in the work of contemporary public theologians from the United States and Germany and suggests four different categories for the relations explored (explicit function, implicit function, public church, church as public). In the second part, it discusses three systematic aspects of these relations. First, following Kuyper, it defines the term ‘church’ more accurately. Second, it offers insights into liturgical research in order to help to sharpen the places where and means by which the implicit shaping of individual ethical behaviour in the church takes place, as exemplified in the work of Dirk Smit. Third, it discusses the task of pastors as mediators between church and theology.

In: International Journal of Public Theology